Neuroscience

Longevity and compression of morbidity from a neuroscience perspective: Do we have a duty to die by a certain age?

Abstract — The search for longevity, if not for immortality itself, has been as old as recorded history. The great strides made in the standard of living and the advances in scientific medicine, have resulted in unprecedented increases in longevity, concomitant with improved quality of life. Thanks to medical progress senior citizens, particularly octogenarians, have …

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God or Man as Final Arbiter of Moral Law by Russell L. Blaylock, MD

I have been following a number of neuroscience issues concerning ethics and morality for years but Dr. Miguel Faria’s observations in his article, “The road being paved to neuroethics: A path leading to bioethics or to neuroscience medical ethics,” appearing in the August 2014 issue of Surgical Neurology International, helped me understand the intricacies of …

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The road being paved to neuroethics: A path leading to bioethics or to neuroscience medical ethics?

Abstract — In 2013, U.S. President Barack Obama decreed the creation of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, as part of his $100 million Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative. In the wake of the work of this Commission, the purpose, goals, possible shortcomings, and even dangers are discussed, and …

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Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 3 — From deep brain stimulation to amygdalotomy for violent behavior, seizures, and pathological aggression in humans

Abstract — In the final installment to this three-part, essay-editorial on psychosurgery, we relate the history of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in humans and glimpse the phenomenal body of work conducted by Dr. Jose Delgado at Yale University from the 1950s to the 1970s. The inception of the National Commission for the Protection of Human …

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Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 2 — From the limbic system and cingulotomy to deep brain stimulation

Abstract — Knowledge of neuroscience flourished during and in the wake of the era of frontal lobotomy, as a byproduct of psychosurgery in the late 1930s and 1940s, revealing fascinating neural pathways and neurophysiologic mechanisms of the limbic system for the formulation of emotions, memory, and human behavior. The creation of the Klüver‑Bucy syndrome in …

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Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 1 — From trephination to lobotomy

Abstract — Psychosurgery was developed early in human prehistory (trephination) as a need perhaps to alter aberrant behavior and treat mental illness. The “American Crowbar Case” provided an impetus to study the brain and human behavior. The frontal lobe syndrome was avidly studied. Frontal lobotomy was developed in the 1930s for the treatment of mental …

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