Hacienda Publishing

Hacienda Publishing

Hacienda Publishing

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Primitive cranial surgery — Scythian trepanations (500-300 B.C.)

Letter to the EditorWorld Neurosurgery Dear Editor, I found the article by Dr. James T. Goodrich on early Scythian trepanations succinct and interesting.[3] There are, nevertheless, a couple of points that need clarification and further explanation. Additionally, Goodrich asks an intriguing question that at least in my estimation has been adequately answered. First, it must …

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A fascinating look at primitive and ancient medicine by medical historian and classical scholar Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD

Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD (1930–2014), the author of this monumental series of tomes on the history of medicine was an accomplished scholar — i.e., physician, scientist, linguist (of classical and several modern languages), pharmacologist, medical historian, and ethicist, as well as thinker, although he did not necessarily claim all of these accomplishments. Prioreschi completed his …

A fascinating look at primitive and ancient medicine by medical historian and classical scholar Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD Read More »

Neolithic trepanation decoded — A unifying hypothesis: Has the mystery as to why primitive surgeons performed cranial surgery been solved?

Abstract — The perplexing mystery of why so many trephined skulls from the Neolithic period have been uncovered all over the world representing attempts at primitive cranial surgery is discussed. More than 1500 trephined skulls have been uncovered throughout the world, from Europe and Scandinavia to North America, from Russia and China to South America …

Neolithic trepanation decoded — A unifying hypothesis: Has the mystery as to why primitive surgeons performed cranial surgery been solved? Read More »

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