Medical Sentinel

Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 3
Volume Number: 2
Summer 1997

As a physician, I have always been a staunch supporter of public health in its traditional role of fighting pestilential diseases and promoting health by educating the public as to hygiene, sanitation, and preventable diseases, as alluded to in my book, Vandals at the Gates of Medicine; but I deeply resent the workings of that unrecognizable part of public health incarnated in the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) with its politicized agenda and proclivity towards result-oriented research based on junk science. It is crystal clear that the NCIPC has from its inception pursued, despite valid criticism from many quarters, a grossly politicized agenda --- abjectly losing sight of its mission and becoming a powerful arm of the gun control lobby --- to the...


Russell L. Blaylock, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 3
Volume Number: 2
Summer 1997

The mastery of human consciousness should be a paramount political objective. Antonio Gramsci We have nothing to repent of. General Kryuchkov, Chairman KGB   Most of the world is aware that the Nazis conducted medical experiments in National Socialist Germany. At least they are somewhat familiar with the eugenic experiments of the infamous Dr. Josef Mengele, since he was the subject of several popular movies, and, after all, that is the source of the average American's knowledge on most subjects. The National Socialist conducted their experiments primarily in two areas: Those with military application and those related to racial extermination or purification. There were lesser experiments conducted concerning disorders not related to either of these broad classifications, such as the...


Stanley K. Monteith, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 3
Volume Number: 2
Summer 1997

It has been said that "men become accomplices to those tragedies which they fail to oppose." Nowhere is that truth more clearly demonstrated than in the apocalypse currently unfolding across the world as the HIV epidemic continues its silent spread from land to land. As of January 1, 1997 over 350,000 Americans will be dead, another 200,000 will be in the terminal stages of their illness, and an additional 600,000 to a million more will be HIV infected. Barring the possibility that protease inhibitors can permanently block HIV-induced immunosuppression, almost all those currently infected will progress to terminal-stage illness and death. The enormity of the tragedy facing America today, however, is dwarfed by the tragedy sweeping Asia and Africa. As of mid-1994, in the small landlocked...


Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 2
Volume Number: 2
Spring 1997

The lessons of history clearly demonstrate to those of us who care to look that whenever science and medicine have come to be under the heavy hand of government, political pressures, or subordinated to the state, the results have been as perverse as they have been disastrous. Towards this end, I would like to share with you an egregious chapter on the perversion of science in the name of politics and ideology that has come down to us from the recent historic record. Although, I will now be referring to the role of science in the former Soviet Union, particularly during the period of the 1930s through the 1950s; as you will see later in this article in reference to the research being carried out by the public health establishment and published in the medical journals, this role could very...


Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 2
Volume Number: 2
Spring 1997

The Hippocratic Oath, Abortion, and the U.S. Supreme Court We are all familiar with Roe v. Wade and no matter what our feelings about abortion may be, we all agree that the consequences of that decision of the U.S. Supreme Court were serious. We assume that all judgments of such an august body are based on wisdom and evidence from many sources and from various backgrounds so that no single element has undue influence in the process; however, it comes as a shock to realize that one of the elements that supported  Roe v. Wade was false: the interpretation of the Hippocratic Oath. The official report of the opinion of the Court on Roe v. Wade reads as follows: What then of the famous Oath that has stood so long as the ethical guide of the medical profession and that bears the name of...


Franklin E. Payne, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 2
Volume Number: 2
Spring 1997

The American Medical Association (AMA) has become a chameleon in its medical ethics. Examples abound. Long after the cancer- and other disease-causing effects of cigarettes were known, the AMA continued to accept money from tobacco, even promoting particular brands.(1) Not until 1981 did the AMA finally sell investments in tobacco stocks under heavy pressure from the news media and anti-tobacco groups of young physicians. Now, the AMA has reversed itself and joined the vigorous and freedom-quenching, anti-smoking campaign that has been in vogue for a decade or more. Hypocrisy. While the AMA prides itself on its former black president, Dr. Lonnie Bristow, the AMA track record on racial discrimination is anything but progressive. In 1895, "a group of black physicians founded the National...


Thomas J. DiLorenzo, PhD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 2
Volume Number: 2
Spring 1997

The advocates of greater governmental control of the medical profession --- and of all professions for that matter --- have decided they must first demonize the defenders of limited, constitutional government. For it is this philosophy, as enshrined in the U.S. Constitution, that stands in the way of their socialistic schemes. Perhaps the notorious example of this phenomenon is President Bill Clinton's widely-publicized 1995 condemnation of conservative and libertarian radio talk show hosts as "purveyors of hatred and division, the promoters of paranoia." "You ought to see some of the things that are said over the airwaves today," the president bemoaned as he hinted at a regulatory crackdown by the Federal Communications Commission. Most remarkable, however, was the president's comment at...


William E. Goodman, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 1
Volume Number: 2
Winter 1997

It was apparent to both politicians and informed observers at the outset that Canada's compulsory socialized medicine scheme (now going on 42 years since the first tentative political steps were taken) would have enormous political appeal. After all, its five politically-promised and mandated principles, (universality, accessibility, comprehensiveness, portability, and public administration), were extremely seductive to the general public; and it was reassuringly touted as an on-demand, "free," no-financial-limit, no-geographic-boundary, no-responsibility-for-payment medical credit card provided by benevolent governments which would pick up the tab --- indefinitely. To any first-year student of economics, it would have been obvious that such an open-ended scheme was fatally flawed and...


Jane M. Orient, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 3
Volume Number: 1
Fall 1996

The purpose of practice guidelines and outcomes research is to optimize the outcome for the collective. As with other designs of “scientific” socialism, serious methodologic flaws are papered over with scientific terminology and quantified opinions. A societal imperative to follow guidelines should be rejected on moral grounds alone, for it repeals and supersedes the Oath of Hippocrates, which states: “I will prescribe regimen for the good of my patients according to my ability and my judgment and never do harm to anyone.” Voluntary guidelines may sometimes be useful and instructive; however, physicians need to examine them critically. The purpose of this article is to review the basic principles of sound scientific research, which should be applied to the evaluation of outcomes research...


John R. Hilsabeck, MD, FACS
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 3
Volume Number: 1
Fall 1996

In Part I of this essay published in the Medical Sentinel, Summer 1996 issue, I discussed three of the seven enemies of the practice of medicine: Non-profit Hospitals/Hospital Administrators, Compulsory National Health Care Consortium, and Government Legislation and Implementation. In Part II, I will conclude my discussion with the remaining four and — particularly, in the case of Insurance Companies and the Medical-Industrial Complex — trace the events which led to their present position of power. Malpractice Squeeze “Malpractice Squeeze” is familiar to all of us. It is now even more important for doctors because all of the changes facing us in providing health care have drastically reduced our net income from medical practice. We practice defensive medicine, which adds one more factor...

Tags: medical care

Jane M. Orient, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 1
Volume Number: 2
Winter 1997

The trend in the medical literature written for practicing physicians is away from the old-fashioned study with “materials and methods,” “results,” and “discussion” sections. The new “consensus statements” on practice guidelines have a different format. Instead of a hypothesis, there is an objective (for example, “to integrate the realization that peptic ulcer most commonly reflects infection with Helicobacter pylori or the use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs into a disease management approach”).(1) Instead of a description of the experimental subjects, there is a list of participants — a panel of experts. A careful exposition of the experiment or the observational protocol is replaced by “evidence and consensus process,” and the evidence comes from a computerized...


Robert Higgs, PhD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 1
Volume Number: 2
Winter 1997

I have recently written three reports on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation of medical devices that summarize and provide documentation for the views I hold regarding the U.S. regulatory system.(1-3) The following report will present eight conclusions I have reached, in the form of comparisons of the U.S. regulatory system with the corresponding systems in Europe, Canada, and Japan. Here they are: (1) During the past 30 years, medical device regulation in the United States has been driven mainly by political forces, especially by the reaction of members of Congress and FDA officials to shocking or scandalous revelations widely disseminated by the news media. Even without such revelations, however, the same political actors have worked relentlessly to increase the scope and...


Robert E. Moffit, PhD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 1
Volume Number: 2
Winter 1997

President Clinton signed the Kassebaum/Kennedy bill, as embodied in the 349-page House/Senate Conference Report on HR 3101, on August 21, 1996.(1) The provisions of the bill will become effective on July 1, 1997. The exception is the four-year Medical Savings Account Demonstration project, arguably the most “controversial” provision. It will become effective January 1, 1997. Over the next several weeks, in the wake of the election, analysts; media commentators, and members of the business, insurance, and medical communities will be talking about its impact on domestic politics as well as its impact on the American health care system. Meanwhile, legal teams from the various professional associations will be poring over the new law, trying to ferret out the meaning of some of the more...


Merrill Matthews Jr., PhD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 2
Volume Number: 2
Summer 1997

Medicare is going bankrupt. That’s the conclusion of the Medicare Board of Trustees in its most recent actuarial report on the financial status of the Health Insurance Trust Fund (known as Medicare Part A), the fund that pays hospital bills. In 1995 the trustees estimated that the Medicare trust fund had sufficient reserves to remain solvent only until the year 2002 (lowered to 2001 in 1996), resulting in a national debate about the future of the Medicare program and how to reform it.(1) The Republicans came up with a proposal which, for all its problems, at least tried to move Medicare in the right direction by slowing its rate of growth and shifting it from a “defined benefit” to a “defined contribution,” i.e., Medicare recipients would be given a specific amount of money to purchase...

Tags: Medicare

John A. Lanzalotti, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 3
Volume Number: 2
Summer 1997

When we hear the term MSA, most of us think of the Goodman model. This is where an MSA is funded with the premium difference from today’s more expensive health plan and a high deductible indemnity insurance policy which is used in conjunction with the MSA to pay health care costs. All of the deductible must be met on an annual basis before the first dollar is paid from the insurance. The non-insurance derived money in the MSA is used to pay for the deductible costs, and any medical discretionary spending done by the family. This model was designed to primarily address those with employer-based insurance as being a more efficient way to control outpatient medical costs. However, this creates a problem for the very sick and the poor and working poor without employer insurance who can’t...

Tags: MSA


It is now legend the AAPS legally lanced the secret task force and pulled its secrets...into the sunshine. It destoyed the Health Security Act.


The Oath of Hippocrates
and the Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time


Patients within a managed care system have the illusion there exists a doctor-patient relationship...But in reality, it is the managers who decide how medical care will be given.


Judicial activism...the capricious rule of man rather than the just rule of law.


The largest single problem facing American medicine today is the actions of government...


The lessons of history sagaciously reveal wherever governments have sought to control medical care and medical practice...the results have been as perverse as they have been disastrous.


Children are the centerpiece of the family, the treasure (and renewal) of countless civilizations, but they should not be used flagrantly to advance political agendas...


Prejudice against gun ownership by ordinary citizens is pervasive in the public health community, even when they profess objectivity and integrity in their scientific research.


The infusion of tax free money into the MSA of the working poor give this population tax equity with wealthier persons...


It was when Congress started dabbling in constitutionally forbidden activities that deficit spending produced a national debt!


Does the AMA have a secret pact with HCFA?


The lure of socialism is that it tells the people there is nothing they cannot have and that all social evils will be redressed by the state.


Canada's fatal error — Health Care as a Right!


The Cancer Risk from Low Level Radiation: A Review of Recent Evidence...


...Moreover, the gun control researchers failed to consider and underestimated the protective benefits of firearms.


Vandals at the Gates of Medicine — Have They Been Repulsed or Are They Over the Top?