Vaccine Scene 2000 — Infectious Diseases and Immunizations (March/April 2000)



Author: Harold E. Buttram, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Science must begin with myths, and with the criticism of myths. Philosophy of Science: A Personal Report," in C. A. Mace (ed.), British Philosophy in the Mid-Century. Sir Karl Popper   In early August of last year congressional hearings were held in Washington D.C. on the question of vaccine safety. Congressman Dan Burton, Chairman of the U. S. House Government Reform Committee, called the hearings. On the weekend of October 2-3, 1999, an autism conference was held at Cherry Hill, New Jersey, sponsored by the Autism Research Institute of San Diego, California. Over 1,000 people were in attendance, the great majority of whom were parents of autistic children. At one point in the meeting, when those parents who thought their child's autism was caused by vaccines were asked to stand, a...




Author: Franklin E. Payne, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


For a half-century, "officials"* have promoted the mass vaccination of the world's population, primarily children. In the United States, recommendations by non-legislative bodies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), have been mandated into state laws by willing legislators who are always ready to promote any action that is for the "good of the children." (Wouldn't you like some laws for the "good of the parents?") As with any medication, vaccines have side effects, allergies, and unintended effects. These range from slight redness at the site of injection to low-grade fevers, paralysis, and death. The milder reactions are more common, and the more severe reactions are rare. Indeed, the latter are so rare statistically...




Author: Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Vaccines --- Kill or Cure? As the controversial debate over mandatory vaccine policy heats up igniting passions, it is perhaps appropriate we summarize what is known about the manifest benefits of modern vaccines, not forgetting the tremendously salutary impact on health and longevity wrought about by better living conditions, hygiene and sanitation, in general, and the introduction and subsequent widespread use of antibiotics, in particular. In Part I of this essay, we discussed the history of vaccinations, the advent of the germ theory of disease, and the ushering in of the dawn of scientific medicine.(1) In Part II, we will weave into this historic tapestry the more contemporary history behind some of the many infectious illnesses of the 20th century and revisit the story as to how...




Author: Conrad F. Meier
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Late last year, in another assault on the truth, President Clinton claimed the rising number of uninsured is due to Congress' failure in 1993 to pass his plan for nationalizing health care.(1) Contrary to his predictable spin, the growing national population of uninsured citizens is a cancer clearly identifiable at the state level with Washington State becoming a textbook case for legislators and single-payer advocates. Make no mistake about this: it is not because state legislators failed to implement universal health care, but precisely because they did! The state of Washington experience is one we should not discharge with a cavalier wave of the hand. It has national implications of a metastasis spreading across this land, with no state, no citizen immune to the effects of liberal (...




Author: M. Stanton Evans
Article Type: Commentary
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Though several political hurdles remain, U.S. consumers could soon have new protections against alleged abuses of "managed care" and HMOs (health maintenance organizations). At the forefront of the new developments are competing bills in Congress, passed by the House and Senate respectively, now scheduled to be reconciled in conference. Simultaneous with these proposals, state legislatures and the courts have also moved to impose new limits on managed care. Obviously, the national backlash against HMOs is having a significant impact. As these comments suggest the Senate plan, reflecting the views of the Republican leadership there, is more friendly to the HMOs --- though less so than has previously been the case. The House legislation, passed by a coalition of Democrats and dissident...


HMO


Author: Hilton P. Terrell, MD, PhD
Article Type: Commentary
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Some of those agencies which fancy themselves as legitimate controllers of medical care have shot themselves in the foot. Vaccination authorities decided some time ago that the hepatitis B immunization series should begin in the newborn period, despite very low risk of hepatitis B during the pediatric years and uncertainty as to the residual protection when those infants enter the years of increased risk from medical occupations, IV drug abuse, and promiscuous sexual practices. State educational agencies quickly added hepatitis B to their long list of immunizations required for entry into day care or school, coercing parents out of one more of their ever shorter list of decisional prerogatives. Other government agencies have long fulminated against mercury in the environment, making the...




Author: Philip D. Ranheim, MD
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Dear Editors, I am happy to be back as a member of AAPS. I appreciate very much the concerns for physician autonomy and quality care for patients expressed in the writings I see in AAPS News and in the Medical Sentinel. I am pleased with the solid ethical base which AAPS demonstrates, as well as concern for innovative plans for providing care to patients. AAPS mission statement emphasizes free enterprise, the ethics of Hippocrates, a focus on the individual patient (as opposed to group care), and the sanctity of the trust-based patient-doctor relationship. What I have not seen much has been discussion of the costs of health care. Does AAPS take a specific interest in finding the least costly way to render quality health care? I am afraid government intervention in health care has some...




Author: P. Gardner Goldsmith
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Dear Editor, With warm regards to Dr. Pat Flanagan, and his insightful commentary on my article "You Copy That?" (Medical Sentinel, November/December 1999), I might contribute these few thoughts. In Dr. Flanagan's commentary, he slightly misconstrues my stance on property rights and their application to clones. As we both agree, one's own DNA falls under the penumbra of private property. But when Dr. Flanagan interprets that I then extend the penumbra of ownership to any animated living product of that DNA --- a clone --- he is mistaken. As I stated, once the gears of life have been set in motion, the entity created is a unique individual, and, as such, retains his own natural rights. He, therefore, cannot be the property of anyone else. I believe the real dilemmas arise in two cases, and...




Author: Compiled by Medical Sentinel Editors
Article Type: News Capsules
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Economics, Ethics, and Physician-Assisted Suicide A new study by Richard S. Mangus, MD, MS, Albert Dipiero, MD, MPH, and Claire E. Hawkins, MS, of The Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland that compared the attitudes and experiences of medical students in Oregon regarding physician-assisted suicide (PAS) "demonstrates support for and willingness by many medical students to participate in PAS." In fact, more than 65 percent of all medical students in this study admitted their willingness to participate in PAS and express the opinion that the practice should be legalized. This figure is in concordance with previous surveys of Oregon physicians who affirm that 60 percent of them agree PAS should be legal in some cases. An interesting part of this study found that the group least...




Author: Lawrence R. Huntoon, MD, PhD
Article Type: President's Page
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Beat your plowshares into swords and your pruning hooks into spears; let the weak man say, "I am a warrior" Joel 3:10 There comes a time in the lives of otherwise peaceful men that one must fight back against unlawful invaders. The practice of medicine in this country has been unlawfully invaded by a tyrannical HCFA bureaucracy and its army of meddling bureaucrats. They have usurped our clinical judgment via thousands of pages of incomprehensible and often contradictory regulations and have interfered with our ability to serve our patients. They have unlawfully invaded the sacrosanct patient-physician relationship, with the clear intent of destroying it and replacing it with a new relationship dictated by Big Brother. Now is the time to shape your intelligence, training, experience, skill...




Author: Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: Editor's Corner
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


Introduction With the issue of mandatory vaccination programs for infants and children, lines have been drawn in the sand. On one side, we find concerned parents, increasingly being supported by dissenting physicians and scientists troubled by the serious side effects of vaccines, which have, in fact, been reported with greater frequency, including serious neurological deficits and even death. Physicians on this side of the line have not only asked for more open data and information to the public, but question the statistics as it regards specifically risks versus benefit studies, the need for adhering to the individual-based ethics and admonition of Hippocrates (photo, right) of first doing no harm, and allowance for more parental involvement and freedom of choice --- that is, the right...




Author: Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


In Part I, an exchange between an AMA Trustee and the author revealed: a) the AMA is hurting for members; b) "organized medicine" has accepted and capitulated to outside, third-party control of the patient-doctor relationship-based practice of medicine; c) the AMA it only hopes to lessen and make more bearable the unConstitutional usurpation. On the contrary, leadership in "throwing the interloper rascals out" is what is demanded to reestablish the finest medical care in the history of the world. In view of the AMA's decision to institutionalize medicine as an "industry" and form a union for "collective bargaining," let us explore this concept of medicine as an industry further. Cardinal rule --- Constant vigilance and a high index of suspicion(1) are necessary to safeguard liberty, and...




Author: Reviewed by Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD
Article Type: Book Review
Issue: March/April 2000
Volume Number: 5
Issue Number: 2


America's founding principles have been subverted and our country is on a steady course toward socialism. Our four founding principles --- the rule of law, individual rights, the guarantee of private property, and a common American identity --- are being replaced by group rights, redistribution, entitlements, and multi-culturalism, and our entire Western culture is in serious jeopardy. This is the message Hungarian-born Balint Vazsonyi, a world renowned concert pianist and historian, brings us based on his encyclopedic knowledge of the past. "It must count among the most amazing spectacles of history to be inundated with the rhetoric, theory, and practice of communism, and see not one communist around. We read and hear daily about class warfare, redistribution of wealth, the "...



It is now legend the AAPS legally lanced the secret task force and pulled its secrets...into the sunshine. It destoyed the Health Security Act.


The Oath of Hippocrates
and the Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time


Patients within a managed care system have the illusion there exists a doctor-patient relationship...But in reality, it is the managers who decide how medical care will be given.


Judicial activism...the capricious rule of man rather than the just rule of law.


The largest single problem facing American medicine today is the actions of government...


The lessons of history sagaciously reveal wherever governments have sought to control medical care and medical practice...the results have been as perverse as they have been disastrous.


Children are the centerpiece of the family, the treasure (and renewal) of countless civilizations, but they should not be used flagrantly to advance political agendas...


Prejudice against gun ownership by ordinary citizens is pervasive in the public health community, even when they profess objectivity and integrity in their scientific research.


The infusion of tax free money into the MSA of the working poor give this population tax equity with wealthier persons...


It was when Congress started dabbling in constitutionally forbidden activities that deficit spending produced a national debt!


Does the AMA have a secret pact with HCFA?


The lure of socialism is that it tells the people there is nothing they cannot have and that all social evils will be redressed by the state.


Canada's fatal error — Health Care as a Right!


The Cancer Risk from Low Level Radiation: A Review of Recent Evidence...


...Moreover, the gun control researchers failed to consider and underestimated the protective benefits of firearms.


Vandals at the Gates of Medicine — Have They Been Repulsed or Are They Over the Top?