Vaccines, Viruses, and Chronic Illnesses (September/October 1999)



Author: Thomas Dorman, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


Secrecy You have probably been wondering what the banner at the head of this essay is doing; I am coming to it. The production of new goods or services is dependent (as Karl Marx correctly learnt from David Ricardo) on labor, but he systematically suppressed the more important contribution --- that of the inventor and the entrepreneur. This intentional neglect has been amplified by the propaganda machine, I have alluded to, for the purpose of creating a new religion, albeit an atheist religion(1) in which catechisms are repeated, facts are ignored, logic is dismissed, and repetition, threats and inducements are combined in the brainwashing technique that has been so successful in diverting the attention of most of our youth away from the success, and the tools of success in our...




Author: Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, Marwan Y. Nasralla, PhD, Joerg Haier, MD, PhD, Robert Erwin, MD, Nancy L. Nicolson, PhD, Richard Ngwenya, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


ABSTRACT Invasive bacterial infections are associated with several acute and chronic illnesses, including: aerodigestive diseases such as Asthma, Pneumonia, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; rheumatoid diseases, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA); immunosuppression diseases such as HIV-AIDS; genitourinary infections and chronic fatigue illnesses such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and Gulf War Illnesses (GWI). It is now apparent that such infections could be (a) causative, (b) cofactors or (c) opportunistic agents in a variety of chronic illnesses. Using Forensic Polymerase Chain Reaction we have looked for the presence of one class of invasive infection (mycoplasmal infections) inside blood leukocyte samples from patients with CFS (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis),...




Author: Lawrence R. Huntoon, MD, PhD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


In view of Dr. Faria's essay, "Is There a Right to Health Care?" in the July/August 1999 issue of the Medical Sentinel,(1) and an editorial which appeared last year in The New England Journal of Medicine,(2) which spoke of a "distributive ethic" akin to corporate socialized medicine, and the collectivist drive toward a right to medical care in America with new proposals for a 28th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution to accomplish such a right,(3) I would like to expound on this issue which is of utmost importance for the survival of the profession and what remains of private medical care. We are told in Dr. Kassirer's editorial that physicians who agree to the distributive ethic of managed care essentially become agents of the Plan instead of advocates for the patient.(2) According to...




Author: M. Tray Dunaway, MD
Article Type: Editorial
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


As medicine moves toward the new millennium, the latest aggression of the federal government with medicine has been launched in the ongoing "fraud and abuse" campaign. The practice of medicine has become criminalized, reimbursements have decreased, and with the passage of the Kassebaum-Kennedy law, the risk of audits by both public and private third party payers is the highest it ever has been. At the essence of this controversy is physician documentation. When I was a medical student, history and physicals were lengthy and tedious. As my proficiency increased, my documentation decreased. The busier I became with patient care, I documented only essentials needed to optimize care. My medical records have taken on new meaning. Third party payers use my documentation as a measure to gauge,...




Author: Doug Fiedor
Article Type: Editorial
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


My father kept his in the bedroom closet. My grandfather said he didn't need one, but when I had to crack his safe because he forgot the combination, I found two old ones in there. My uncle kept his on top of the chest of drawers in the bedroom. As a child, all of my friends had essentially the same experiences. In my 14th summer, Elvis made the charts with "Heartbreak Hotel." I had a little jingle in my pocket from my paper route, mowing grass and caddying for the rich folks down at the fancy golf course. Because, you see, I wanted one, too. So I worked and saved for it. Well, there came a day back that summer when I had the $25 I needed, so I peddled my bicycle the seven miles over to the closest Wards store. And therein, I purchased my first one: A brand new bolt-action, single shot...




Author: Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD
Article Type: Commentary
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


"When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean --- neither more nor less." "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make wordsmean so many different things."Lewis Carroll Through The Looking Glass  I read the excellent review by Delbert Meyer, M.D. of Drs. Edmund Pellegrino and David Thomasma's book, For The Patient's Good, in the May/June 1999 Medical Sentinel. I would like to offer some additional observations that perhaps he did not consider. Ethics is not a series of theories, but a systematic study of values which will allow our actions to conform to reality. Through ethics, we identify a code of values to guide our choices in order to live morally as happily as possible under the existing circumstances.(1)...




Author: Harry Browne
Article Type: Commentary
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


There is good news and bad news regarding the Y2K computer problem. The good news: Civilization isn't going to collapse in the year 2000. The bad news: I don't know where you can unload all the coins and food storage you've acquired. Some companies and some government agencies will have problems on January 1, 2000 --- when some of their computers think it's January 1, 1900. But most companies will have no major problems, and life will go on largely undisturbed. For most of us, the problems of January 2000 will be smaller than the inconveniences we already endure --- such as the power failures from government-sheltered electric companies when we need air conditioning in the summer or heat in the winter. The Y2K problem has been exaggerated by people who don't understand computers, and by...


Y2K


Author: Edward R. Teitel, MD, MBA
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


Dear Editor, When I read the editorial "Misinformation" by Arthur B. Robinson, Ph.D. (Medical Sentinel, May/June 1999), I couldn't help but wish it were true that with the availability of unfiltered information "...truth will be the winner and misinformation the loser." The problem with this optimism is it's based on the false premise the reason misinformation and propaganda works is because the truth is unavailable. In a dictatorship, the reason for accepting propaganda may well be the failure to be exposed to the truth, but the problem in a democracy is the failure to accept the truth when exposed to it. The success of propaganda in a democracy is based upon the desire of the listener to believe it. He wants to believe it, not only because the notion proposed by the propagandist is...




Author: Jane M. Orient, MD
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


Dear Editor, Harry Browne's point about the difficulty of incremental change in the welfare state is very well taken. But I believe he underestimates the difficulty in achieving dramatic change. Recently I attended a seminar in which the facilitator spoke about how we should all pay our taxes joyfully, as he does. I'd be willing to bet that he, like so many other Americans, does not really pay income taxes. His pay is totally derived from tax revenues, without which his paycheck would be $0. He only pretends to pay taxes by receiving less money than the nominal amount of his salary. The payroll tax burden is far higher than the income tax burden for millions of Americans, and Mr. Browne does not comment on that. And what about those who benefit from a negative income tax, or earned income...




Author: Anthony Deden
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 6


Dear Editor, With very few exceptions, doctors in general, had been my impression, are a self-absorbed and intellectually weak group. After all, they have caved in to the pressure of malpractice litigation onslaught and the takeover of the practice of medicine by government kleptocrats and an assorted variety of leeches masquerading as reformers and do-gooders. I know now this is not true as I have just read your magazine which a physician friend handed me a few hours ago. Even as I am not a member of the medical profession, I salute your pursuit, your intellectual anchors in liberty and limited government, and your taking a stand for what is right and just. In the war of ideas, I urge you not to settle for the middle ground. For this war is about freedom to exercise one's self interest...




Author: Donald E. Hura, MD
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


Dear Editor, I read with great interest your article in the May/June 1999 issue of the Medical Sentinel. I cannot applaud you enough for exposing the Journal of the American Medical Association and the AMA for the socialistic biases they have obviously supported. When I began my private practice in 1990, I automatically joined the AMA because I erroneously thought they would protect my interest as a voice for physicians across our profession. However, as the years went by and I paid close attention as to what actually was occurring through their overtly bureaucratic Chicago office, it became very clear to me that, as physicians, our interests were not a priority or even secondary. This culminated approximately two years ago when I read an article published by the AMA president in their...




Author: Nino M. Camardese, MD
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


Dear Editor, Your recent editorial (May/June 1999 Medical Sentinel) is an aggregate of facts and truths that sets the record straight as to how American medicine is becoming socialized. Tragically, since the late 1930s, too often the AMA leadership has not only yielded to liberal political leaders, ploys, and socialistic programs --- but the AMA leadership itself has acted and proposed plans not in harmony with the highest standards of Hippocratic ethics. Indeed, many times they have acted even contrary to same. For example, in 1977 and for several years preceding, the AMA was working to advance National Health Insurance. In 1977, the AMA's bill in Congress, H.R. 1818, sponsored National Health Insurance. It was through the yeoman efforts of yours truly, through calling the first Special...




Author: Thayer Smith, MD
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


Dear Editor, Conrad Meier's article on snake oil in health care policy (Medical Sentinel, May/June 1999) deftly calls attention to the adverse effects of state-mandated coverages in health insurance policies. Required inclusion of many paramedical services, routine checkups, and other ancillary items progressively boost premiums beyond an affordable range, with the predictable result that there are fewer people who take out insurance or continue existing policies. He then cites last year's study by the Galen Institute in partners with the Heritage Foundation, in which 16 states with the most sweeping burdens had been foisted on insurance policies, had increases of uninsured in the population eight times that of the remaining, less regulated states. Table 2, showing the increases of...




Author: Miguel A. Faria, Jr., M.D.
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


Dear Dr. Harris, The article, "Around the Continent in 180 Days: The Controversial Journey of Abraham Flexner," by Mark D. Hiatt (Pharos, Winter 1999) is the most factual and best researched piece written about Abraham Flexner and his legacy in recent memory. I suspect that many readers of The Pharos have only read platitudes and accolades about Flexner and his great legacy over the years... We learn from this article (and from Flexner's 1960 autobiography) that he more than failed his grandmother's admonition of "not leaping to hasty conclusions."(1) In fact, the evidence points toward the inescapable conclusion that Flexner had and worked with preconceived notions, with premeditated ideas of what he wanted to find in the unscientific survey of medical schools he conducted, and the...




Author: Compiled by Medical Sentinel Editors
Article Type: News Capsules
Issue: September/October 1999
Volume Number: 4
Issue Number: 5


Kudos to Dr. Camardese Dr. Nino Camardese of Norwalk, Ohio was honored to be a guest speaker at the 27th annual national convention of the American Academy of Physician Assistants which took place in Atlanta, Georgia, May 29-June 3, 1999. Approximately 6,500 attendees registered at the convention. Dr. Camardese lectured about today's state of medicine and protested the violation of many Constitutional safeguards contained not only in the Bill of Rights but also in the Medicare law Sections 1801, 1802, and 1803. Bravo, Dr. Camardese! Reform MSAs Now! A group of 43 Republican Senators recently wrote Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-MS) recommending key corrections in Medical Savings Account legislation. The four-year MSA pilot program is entering its third year with many people who were...



It is now legend the AAPS legally lanced the secret task force and pulled its secrets...into the sunshine. It destoyed the Health Security Act.


The Oath of Hippocrates
and the Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time


Patients within a managed care system have the illusion there exists a doctor-patient relationship...But in reality, it is the managers who decide how medical care will be given.


Judicial activism...the capricious rule of man rather than the just rule of law.


The largest single problem facing American medicine today is the actions of government...


The lessons of history sagaciously reveal wherever governments have sought to control medical care and medical practice...the results have been as perverse as they have been disastrous.


Children are the centerpiece of the family, the treasure (and renewal) of countless civilizations, but they should not be used flagrantly to advance political agendas...


Prejudice against gun ownership by ordinary citizens is pervasive in the public health community, even when they profess objectivity and integrity in their scientific research.


The infusion of tax free money into the MSA of the working poor give this population tax equity with wealthier persons...


It was when Congress started dabbling in constitutionally forbidden activities that deficit spending produced a national debt!


Does the AMA have a secret pact with HCFA?


The lure of socialism is that it tells the people there is nothing they cannot have and that all social evils will be redressed by the state.


Canada's fatal error — Health Care as a Right!


The Cancer Risk from Low Level Radiation: A Review of Recent Evidence...


...Moreover, the gun control researchers failed to consider and underestimated the protective benefits of firearms.


Vandals at the Gates of Medicine — Have They Been Repulsed or Are They Over the Top?