Neuropharmacology and Behavior (Spring 2002)



Author: Russell L. Blaylock, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


Our country is rotting. It is sick with a disease so shockingthat we turn our faces from it in dread. Increasingly, it is home to a class of citizens for whomthe most basic rules of social organization have come unraveled. Jared Taylor Paved With Good Intentions By pushing drugs into this group, crime and general erosion of Western moral values would be stimulated because the drugs destroyed the judgment and led people into crime, homosexuality, and other immoral activities. Joseph D. Douglass, Jr., PhD Red Cocaine: The Drugging of America   During the Korean War, large amounts of drugs were smuggled into the American camps for the main purpose of weakening the American war effort. The success of this Chinese communist ploy did not go unnoticed by Soviet Leader Nikita Khrushchev....




Author: George R. Barnes, PhD, Patricia B. Cerrito, PhD, Inessa Levi, PhD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


Introduction In 1998, the National Institutes of Health held a consensus panel to examine the issue of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The consensus panel concluded that "at the present time, there is a paucity of data providing information on long-term treatment beyond 14 months. Although trials combining drugs and behavioral modalities are under way, conclusive recommendations concerning treatment for the long term cannot be made easily."(1) Children diagnosed with ADHD are typically medicated for years. The medications used, including Ritalin®, have been studied for over 40 years. Why, then, is there no long-term, definitive study? Is it sufficient to study treatment outcomes for about a year or less? In the absence of definitive evidence that medical treatment is...




Author: Hilton P. Terrell, MD, PhD
Article Type: Commentary
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


On November 6, 2000, a prepublication version of an article concerning a relationship between phenylpropanolamine and stroke was released for Internet posting.(1) The reason for the early release of the study was a judgment that the information was so critical that waiting even a few weeks would endanger the public health. Triggered by this report, all products containing the drug were withdrawn from store shelves. These actions are a nationwide equivalent of evacuating a shopping mall because a suspicious package has been found that might be a bomb. In the case of a shopping mall, however, the public would be readmitted after the package has been removed and examined. If the package were an innocent Christmas gift, efforts would be made to return it to its owner. In the case of...




Author: Scott Esposito
Article Type: Commentary
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


The problem of FDA "drug lag" is widely recognized. New drugs are approved more quickly in Europe than the almost nine years it takes to get approval in the United States. Yet because drug recalls are just as rare in Europe as in the United States, Europeans seem none the worse for the shorter approval time; indeed, to the extent that Europeans can use new, health-enhancing drugs sooner, they are better off than their American cousins. The European comparison shows that Americans would benefit from a streamlined FDA drug approval process. But, ironically, Americans can observe a safe, "unregulated" pharmaceutical market in their own backyard --- through the widespread practice of off-label drug prescriptions. "Off-label" prescriptions are uses of FDA-approved drugs for purposes other...


FDA


Author: Twila Brase, RN
Article Type: Commentary
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


To combat bioterrorism, federal health officials have proposed that state legislators give state health officials new powers over citizens. The powers proposed in the Model State Emergency Health Powers Act would be broad and sweeping, forcing citizens to submit to physical examinations, tests, quarantine and vaccinations against their will. Some states, including Minnesota, are already considering enactment in 2002. Citizens' Council on Health Care (CCHC) is concerned that the proposal would provide intrusive authority for purposes far beyond bioterrorism. According to press accounts, the writing of the Act began well before September 11th --- the day of the terrorist attack. Unfortunately, the terrorist attack and the public's new awareness of bioterrorism have given public health...


CDC


Author: Samia Borchers, MD
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


Dear Editor, I received two faxes from the AMA in the past week. It asks for my help in contacting senators regarding their work with physician payments. If not changed we will lose about 5 percent in fees. Maybe some other readers received the same fax. I asked my secretary to call the listed 800 number for me, which was supposed to direct me on the course of action. When she gave the AMA my physician number on the form, she was told that I have not been a member since 1996! They refused to give me any more information on the matter or how to contact the senators on the matter. I found the episode appalling and even I was surprised at their tactics. Samia Borchers, MD Dayton, OH Correspondence originally published in the Medical Sentinel 2002;7(1);1. Copyright©2002 Association of...


AMA


Author: Professor R.J. Rummel
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


Dear Dr. Faria, ...You're doing a great service on the issue of gun control and whenever it comes up in my correspondence, I direct people to your work... You may be interested in my updated chart on democide [people killed by their own government] at http://www.hawaii.edu/powerkills/VIS.TEARS.ALL.AROUND.HTM. It plots democide compared to the greatest causes/factors of death in 1998. Democide deaths exceed those for illicit drugs, sexually transmitted diseases, air pollution, alcohol, all domestic/foreign wars, traffic accidents, homicides, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco. In fact, governments murdered more people than died in total from war, traffic accidents, homicides, and alcohol combined. Thanks for reference to your piece on Cuba... Best wishes...




Author: Russell L. Blaylock, MD
Article Type: Correspondence
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


Dear Dr. Faria, I just finished reading your magnificent book. It is a powerful tour de force that spares no feeling on the left. It is a rare book in that it names names and calls the murderers to account, if not in a judicial sense, at least historically. From this point on, all who read your book will know who these dastardly, evil men are, and exactly the crimes they committed. That gives some satisfaction to those who have suffered and continue to suffer. I must admit, I had to hold back the tears as I read of your family's bravery and courage in the face of Castro's totalitarian death state. I was particularly moved to tears on your recounting of you and your father's escape by sea. I know that, at least for your father, foremost in his mind were the ghosts of the 36,000 brave...




Author: Compiled by Medical Sentinel Editors
Article Type: News Capsules
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


What Happened to Civil Defense? "Some time during the first Bush administration, America completely scrapped any vestige of its fledgling civil defense structure. It had eroded badly during President Carter's administration, when the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) took over as the lead agency for civil defense. "In other words, the real 'defense' work --- protecting the American people from attack --- was removed from the Defense Department. That is when the Defense Department became the 'Offense Department.' "It got worse during eight years of Clinton. FEMA's meager efforts to maintain equipment needed for saving lives in a future nuclear war were cut from the budget. The equipment was destroyed, lost, sold or abandoned. "For years, a political movement determined to disarm...




Author: Robert R. Urban, MD
Article Type: President's Page
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


This is the story of a young man who believed in himself and in the American system. After high school and a two-year hitch in the army just after World War II, he worked his way through college and medical school, married his high school sweetheart, completed his training, and found the small town of his dreams. As a family physician of the fifties, he treated sore throats and infected ears, he mended bones with his hands and a fluoroscope, and over the next fifteen years, delivered more than fifteen hundred babies, without specialists or high tech, including one set of beautiful, healthy triplets. He welcomed the challenge of the whole spectrum of medicine, from the simple cold to the heart attacks and cancer. He never became wealthy, but he and his family always lived comfortably. His...




Author: Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: Editor's Corner
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


The different versions of the Patients' Bill of Rights passed in the Senate last June and in the House the following August have been stalled in Conference Committee. Writing for the Galen Institute, Grace-Marie Turner asked, "Can Congress in good conscience pass the Patients' Bill of Rights in 2002 and guarantee an increase in the number of uninsured in the midst of a recession? Let's hope not."(1) The economic stimulus package that passed the House on December 20, 2001, contained a Republican provision for refundable tax credits covering up to 60 percent of the cost of the health insurance policy with no caps. Although the measure died in the Senate after being squashed by Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-SD), it appears the direction of health care reform may be shifting from a...




Author: Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


Here are the concluding remarks of Howard Phillips on the Constitution of the(se) United States. Once again, let us each resolve to expend ourselves to the reestablishment of our Republic to its Constitutional limitations and Biblical undergirding presuppositions. Although the Constitution contains the language that "Congress shall have Power...To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations," George W. Bush, like Bill Clinton and like Bush's father, has sought to eliminate the Constitutional role of the people's elected representatives with respect to matters of trade, not only when it comes to NAFTA, the World Trade Organization, and the President's Special Trade Representative, but, even with regard to something called "fast track" authority --- now euphemistically relabeled "trade...




Author: The Federalist
Article Type: Report from the States
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


Armed with billions of dollars from settlements in the tobacco lawsuits and other big money cases, trial lawyers are seeking to discredit and take away many of the benefits of tort reforms adopted around the country in recent years. Fortunately, a new Texas study is providing facts to combat their campaign of disinformation. The study, conducted for Citizens for a Sound Economy by The Perryman Group, an economic research and analysis group based in Waco, Texas, looked at inflation, personal income, job creation and other economic factors to determine the success and benefits of tort reforms championed by George W. Bush and passed by the Texas Legislature in 1995. The overall impact of tort reform on the Texas economy, including all direct, indirect, and induced effects, is estimated for...




Author: James L. Pendleton, MD
Article Type: Report from the States
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


The Pennsylvania Chapter of AAPS has developed a program to promote medical savings account (MSA) plans to physicians and the public. The program consists of four videotapes and audiotapes of a speech by economist Merrill Matthews, Jr., PhD, edited differently for different audiences. Full video (36 min.): This video presents the entire speech. It illustrates MSAs by analogy, describes the specifics of how they work, why doctors will like them, why patients will like them, what has prevented them from becoming widely used and what should be done to make them widely effective. It is most suitable for audiences interested in more extended information about MSAs, such as those attending medical educational programs. Abbreviated video (16 min.): This version is sufficient to explain the...


MSA


Author: Reviewed by Delbert H. Meyer, MD
Article Type: Book Review
Issue: Spring 2002
Volume Number: 7
Issue Number: 1


The For Dummies® computer book series is written for frustrated computer users who know they aren't dumb, but find the PC and its vocabulary make them feel helpless. This compact volume helps sort out the extensive healthcare sites. The Wolinskys caution you in using the web: never use it for emergencies. However, to better equip you to prepare for emergencies, it directs you to the American College of Emergency Physicians' site at http://www.acep.org. Dr. C. Everett Koop's www.DrugChecker.com lists drugs and interactions. However, complementary expected effects of drugs used for blood pressure reduction, like ACE inhibitors and beta blockers, are listed as moderate serious interactions. If you'd like to fill prescriptions on the internet, try www.DestinationRx.com. It lists medications...



It is now legend the AAPS legally lanced the secret task force and pulled its secrets...into the sunshine. It destoyed the Health Security Act.


The Oath of Hippocrates
and the Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time


Patients within a managed care system have the illusion there exists a doctor-patient relationship...But in reality, it is the managers who decide how medical care will be given.


Judicial activism...the capricious rule of man rather than the just rule of law.


The largest single problem facing American medicine today is the actions of government...


The lessons of history sagaciously reveal wherever governments have sought to control medical care and medical practice...the results have been as perverse as they have been disastrous.


Children are the centerpiece of the family, the treasure (and renewal) of countless civilizations, but they should not be used flagrantly to advance political agendas...


Prejudice against gun ownership by ordinary citizens is pervasive in the public health community, even when they profess objectivity and integrity in their scientific research.


The infusion of tax free money into the MSA of the working poor give this population tax equity with wealthier persons...


It was when Congress started dabbling in constitutionally forbidden activities that deficit spending produced a national debt!


Does the AMA have a secret pact with HCFA?


The lure of socialism is that it tells the people there is nothing they cannot have and that all social evils will be redressed by the state.


Canada's fatal error — Health Care as a Right!


The Cancer Risk from Low Level Radiation: A Review of Recent Evidence...


...Moreover, the gun control researchers failed to consider and underestimated the protective benefits of firearms.


Vandals at the Gates of Medicine — Have They Been Repulsed or Are They Over the Top?