Ayn Rand

The Political Spectrum (Part II) — The Center: A Democracy or a Constitutional Republic?

"...Republicans, Libertarians, and Objectivists (i.e., the political philosophy of Ayn Rand [1905-1982; photo, left] the great Russian-American author, novelist and thinker) believe the functions of government are limited to those immediately enumerated in the U.S. Constitution..."


Political Spectrum HorseshoeThe Political Spectrum (Part I): The Totalitarian Left from Communism to Social Democracy

"The Right versus Left...political arrangement came from the seating position of National Assembly delegates during the French Revolution, but ... I have found it easier to have a political spectrum based on degrees of government control."


Stalin's Mysteriious DeathStalin's Mysterious Death

In a historic medical article published in Surgical Neurology International, Dr. Faria cites compelling evidence that the Soviet dictator was likely poisoned under the direction of his right hand henchman, Lavrenti Beria, with the very probable connivance of Nikita Khrushchev, who eventually succeeded Stalin and went on to dismantle Stalin's Cult of Personality and expose the "errors" of the former regime.


Young Stalin Book Title for Young Stalin

Absorbing, and authoritative biography of Joseph Stalin's early years — from Georgia bandit to Red Tsar!


American Flag 

America, Guns and Freedom — An International Perspective

...Guns in the hands of law‑abiding citizens deter crimes, and nations that trust their citizens with firearms have governments that sustain liberty and affirm individual freedom...


Gun control

Gun Control and the Hallmarks of Tyranny — A Reappraisal

Gun control, along with loss of liberty and repression, features in the unfolding, authoritarian designs of a burgeoning police state.


United NationsThe UN and Gun Rights — Taking a Soporific or Guarding the Precious Jewel?

Guarding our Second Amendment rights from usurpation by the UN Small Arms Treaty is paramount.


I'd like to exchange ObamaCare
"And we better get used to the rationing and lack of choices we will increasingly be facing, as American medicine becomes more and more socialized..."


Russian President Vladimir PutinRussia's invasion of the Ukraine — Tsarism or Stalinism anew?

Just as I was beginning to warm up to Vladimir Putin...the Russian President and his minions in the Ukraine invade the Crimean peninsula and threaten to foment a second cold war!


Who Will Blink First?Obama's Mid-term Report Card — Foreign Policy at a glance!

Barack Obama swore as U.S. President to uphold the Constitution of the United States....


Obama's Report Card 2014 Civil LibertyObama's Mid-term (Spring 2014) Report Card — Protecting the Personal Freedom of Americans!

...A look at his job of protecting the civil liberties and personal freedom of Americans...

Featured Articles

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Abstract — In discussing bioethics and the formulation of neuroethics, the question has arisen as to whether secular humanism should be the sole philosophical guiding light, to the exclusion of any discussion (or even mention) of religious morality, in professional medical ethics. In addition, the question has arisen as to whether freedom or censorship should be part of medical (and neuroscience) journalism. Should independent medical journals abstain from discussing certain issues, or should only the major medical journals — i.e., the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) or Lancet — be heard, speaking with one “consensual,” authoritative voice? This issue is particularly important in controversial topics impacting medical politics — e.g., public health policy, socio-economics, bioethics, and the so-called redistributive justice in health care. Should all sides be heard when those controversial topics are discussed or only a consensual (monolithic) side? This historical review article discusses those issues and opts for freedom in medical and surgical practice as well as freedom in medical journalism, particularly in...



Monday, June 15, 2015

This is the third volume of the monumental A History of Medicine series by the medical historian and classical scholar Plinio Prioreschi M.D., PhD.[1] A limited number of these books were published, and the reader would be fortunate to find copies of the tomes for less than $350 U.S. dollars. We have already reviewed Volume I: Primitive and Ancient Medicine (2nd edition, 1995) and Volume II: Greek Medicine (2nd edition, 1996).[2,3] We found both of these tomes to be excellent journeys to the history of medicine (and indirectly medical ethics). This third volume continues the well‑researched scholarly tradition as well as hypnotic eloquence of Dr. Plinio Prioreschi’s narrative.

Once again, it is worth repeating that Dr. Prioreschi does not hesitate to deviate from orthodox or dogmatic views when new facts have come to light, when previous information has been neglected or misinterpreted, or when logical reasoning calls for a new interpretation of the facts. He does the same in this, the heftiest of the first three volumes — if one includes his Foreword, Introduction, and Index — at over 800 pages.

By 268 B.C., Rome was the eternal city, the caput mundi and mistress...





Fransini Giraldo is a Colombian girl who dances her own style of Salsa. In this video, she dances to the rhythm of Sonora Carruseles de Colombia, presumably in the Colombia countryside. Published July 16, 2013.