U.S. Constitution

Faria: ObamaCare — Toward Free Market or Socialized Medicine?

Journal/Website: 
GOPUSA.com
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Monday, September 26, 2011

In a recent letter to the editor published in my local newspaper, the Macon Telegraph (9/16/11), Jack Bernard, a self-described "Republican,” retired health care executive, was "disconcerted by the ideological free market rigidity” that he observed during a debate by the Republican presidential candidates concerning “the health care reform question.”

A Brief History of Socialism in America

From 1876 onward, after the North recovered its fortunes and the South was unburdened by the end of Reconstruction, the nation was ruled by laissez-faire capitalism, and freedom flourished for most (not all) of the nations' citizens. The rapid pace of the Industrial Revolution brought about an exemplary standard of living but also new problems for the rapidly developing nation, and socialistic or progressive "reforms" appeared in this country for the first time.

Faria: The Electoral College in the U.S. Constitutional Republic

Journal/Website: 
GOPUSA.com
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Thursday, November 17, 2016

This summer at least three editorials have appeared in my local, Georgia newspaper, the Macon Telegraph, about how the Electoral College process works and explaining why our Founding Fathers created that system for presidential elections. They were not always accurate. One writer, for example, wrote, "The framers... felt the common, everyday, average, eligible voter was not intelligent, well-versed, well-read and knowledgeable enough to vote for the most qualified and best candidate.”

The Electoral College in the U.S. Constitutional Republic

Douglas Harden wrote an informative column (Macon Telegraph, Aug. 14) about how the Electoral College process works and explained why our Founding Fathers created that system for presidential elections.

However, I beg to differ with his assertion, “The framers... felt the common, everyday, average, eligible voter was not intelligent, well-versed, well-read and knowledgeable enough to vote for the most qualified and best candidate.”

Medicine and the Law

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
Medicine and the Law
Issue: 
Spring 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
1

Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution delegates to the Federal Government its powers. The businesses of medical care and insurance are not mentioned therein.  And, Amendment X to the U.S. Constitution states that those powers not specifically delegated to the Federal Government are retained by the states and the people. Therefore, nothing in the venerable document authorizes the Federal Government to run medical care and insurance.

Section 1801 of Public Law 89-97 (July 30, 1965) of the Medicare Statute prohibits Federal interference in the practice of medicine:

RE: The Constitution — Plain and Simple

Author: 
Rep. Charlie Norwood
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

Dear Editors,

Thank you for sending me the informative article[s] on the Constitution. It is a pleasure to hear from you.

RE: The Constitution — Plain and Simple

Author: 
Bert Loftman, MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

Dear Editor,

“The Constitution — Plain and Simple, Taxation” by Curtis Caine, M.D., (Medical Sentinel, May/June 1998) was excellent. I enjoyed his discussion on the origins of the income tax and how this opened the “Pandora’s box” of a big oppressive government that ignored our Constitution. However, perhaps the most important problems of the income tax is not what it does to the government, but what it does to the American people.

RE: The Constitution — Plain and Simple with Author's Response

Author: 
Kenneth D. Hansen, MD, JD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

Dear Editor,

Office Holder Requirements (and Impeachment)

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
November/December 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
6

In the September/October 1998 issue of the Medical Sentinel, this column explored the Constitutional provisions for “Voter Requirements” — intentionally, as a prologue to this logical sequel on “Office Holder Requirements.” Get out your copy and follow along:

U.S. Constitution 101

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
Spring 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
1

The Constitution of these American States United is their simple, plainly-worded founding charter. It is the supreme Law of the Land. Every act of every citizen (in and out of government), every statute of Congress, every "advice and consent" of the Senate, every word and deed of the Chief Executive and his agencies, and every decision of the Judiciary must conform to, be authorized by, and be within the boundaries of the Constitution. The Constitution is to be read, studied, understood, obeyed, and supported; not interpreted.

The Sixteenth Amendment

Author: 
Bert A. Loftman, MD
Article Type: 
Commentary
Issue: 
Spring 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
1

Thomas Jefferson's vision was that the smallest and most local government would maximize individual freedoms and best serve the public good. In a letter to Tom Pinkney, Jefferson stated: "Both of our political parties, at least the honest part of them, agree conscientiously in the same object --- the public good; but they differ essentially in what they deem the means of promoting that good. One side believes it best done by one composition of the governing powers; the other, by a different one.

Why the Declaration Was Written and the Constitution Adopted

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
Summer 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
2

When the repeated petitions by the Colonists for redress of their grievances against the King of England met only with additional injury and abuse, the Colonists felt compelled to sever their relationship with the Crown in the Year of our Lord 1776. They listed 27 "causes that impel[led] them to the separation" and declared themselves to be "Free and Independent States."(1)

Here are a few of the 1776 "Facts...submitted to a candid world" in support of their Declaration of Independence vis-a-vis 1996 imposed reincarnations:

Perquisites

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
Fall 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
3

The fringe benefits of employment or of a corporate position, such as "health insurance," sick leave, days off, bonuses, paid vacations, provision of a car, health club membership, a telephone credit card, etc., are nowadays generically called "perks." But perks are not new.

The Seventeenth Amendment

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
Winter 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
1

In the preceding three articles in this section, The Constitution - Plain and Simple, which I have authored (1-3), and in the commentary, "The Sixteenth Amendment" by Bert Loftman, MD (4), we have seen how our constitution, the Law of the Land, has been abused and disused both by those who are sworn to defend and uphold it, and those who have fallen asleep at their post, shirking their duties as befit informed and vigilant citizens of our Constitutional Republic.

Treaties

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
Spring 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
2

We are told at every turn that "treaties supersede the Constitution of The[se] States United" --- nugatory. Here is what Article VI, paragraph 2 actually stipulates on the issue: "...all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution [of any State] or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding. [Emphasis added.]"

The Founders on Government: Implications for Economic Freedom

Author: 
Thomas J. DiLorenzo, PhD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Spring 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
2

The advocates of greater governmental control of the medical profession --- and of all professions for that matter --- have decided they must first demonize the defenders of limited, constitutional government. For it is this philosophy, as enshrined in the U.S. Constitution, that stands in the way of their socialistic schemes.

The(se) United States

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
Summer 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
3

Pop Quiz: How many United States of America are there?
Answer: "That's simple. Everybody knows there is just one."
Grade: F. Wrong! Here's why.

General Welfare

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
Fall 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
4

If I were to tell you there is a constitutional subject that is expressed in a countless number of words; that is argued endlessly; that a myriad of books have been written about; that legions of court cases have been filed over and many judicial decrees have been issued upon; that many laws have been enacted to implement; that endless regulations have been promulgated under its purview; that trillions of dollars have been expended under its authority; but on which there is still no unanimity --- what would you believe I was referring to?

Part I: The Colonies Become States

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
January/February 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
1

Those of you reading this issue of the Medical Sentinel may or may not have read its previous columns on the U.S. Constitution. Therefore, what may have been said before and repeated subsequently is intentional to provide instant reference and clarity. Repetition enhances memory and constitutional concepts are worth repeating and remembering.(1,2)

Part II: The States Form a Union

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
March/April 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
2

In Part I of this article, we expounded briefly on the political history of how the Colonies via a successful revolution became States, and how then in the year 1913, via the troika of the Sixteenth Amendment,(1) the establishment of the Federal Reserve System and particularly the Seventeenth Amendment,(2) the Republic was on its way to virtually becoming a democracy.(3)

Taxation

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
May/June 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
3

Some months ago, copies of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution were sent by AAPS to its entire subscriber list as an enclosure with a monthly AAPS News. Let me suggest you dig yours out and follow along with it as we study the Constitution in these columns.

NO MORE WACOS by David B. Kopel and Paul H. Blackman and WACO: The Rules of Engagement by Dan Gifford, Amy Gifford, and William Gazecki

Author: 
Reviewed by Delbert H. Meyer, MD
Article Type: 
Book and Video Review
Issue: 
July/August 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
4

No free man shall be taken or imprisoned or dispossessed, or outlawed, or banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will we go upon him, nor send upon him, except by the legal judgement of his peers or by the law of the land.
Magna Carta, par. 39

No More Wacos --- What's Wrong With Federal Law Enforcement and How to Fix It

Foreign to Our Constitution

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
July/August 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
4

In a business or organization, an industrious person with ability and ambition may, by hard work, rightfully gain a position of authority over others who voluntarily submit.

Voter Requirements

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

Article I, Section 2, paragraph 1 of the 1787 Constitution (ratified in 1791) of these States in Federal Union specifies that in the election of members of the House of Representatives "...the Electors [voters] in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature."

Are We the Enemy?

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

...Its leaders were supposed to save the country
but now they won't pay her no mind.
...Because the people got fat and grew lazy,
now their vote is like a meaningless joke.
You know they talk about law, about order, but it's all just an echo of what they've been told. 'Cause there is a monster on the loose. It's got our heads into the noose,
and it just sits there watching...

Census

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
January/February 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
1

Open Letter to George Will:

The Founding Fathers, High Crimes and Misdemeanors, and Impeachment

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
January/February 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
1

When our Founding Fathers met during the deliberations of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia (May-Sept. 1787), they established the impeachment process as the constitutional remedy for those public servants who would potentially violate the public trust. The impeachment process was part of the carefully crafted system of checks and balances, separation of powers, and limited government with the consent of the governed, and other enlightened principles inherent to a constitutional republic.

A More Perfect Union --- Part I

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
March/April 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
2

Let us begin with some pertinent definitions --- Webster, Random House, etc. define:

Axiom: A self-evident, univer-sally accepted truth.
Maxim: A rule of maximum weight, sanctioned by experience.
Aphorism: A short expression of a principle.
Adage: A long established saying that has obtained authority by long use.
Proverb: An adage couched in a vivid concrete phrase.
Saying: A brief habitual expression.

A More Perfect Union --- Part II

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
May/June 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
3

In Part I of this column, we discussed how our Founding Fathers met in Philadelphia in 1787 "for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation...to render the Federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of Government and the preservation of the Union," and what was to have been a revising convention became a replacement convention.

U.S. Constitution 201 --- A Conspiracy

Author: 
Curtis W. Caine, MD
Article Type: 
The Constitution - Plain and Simple
Issue: 
July/August 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
4

Every issue of the Medical Sentinel has contained an article on The Constitution --- Plain and Simple. Volume 1, Number 1 was headed freshman "U.S. Constitution 101." Each column was planned as extant to stand on its own, and as progressive background.



Diary of Dreams performs at the 2016 M’era Luna festival in Hildesheim, Germany. M’era Luna, “one of the biggest dark music events in Germany,” is held each year on the second weekend in August. Close to 25,000 people attend the festival annually to hear gothic, metal and industrial music performed on two large festival-style stages.