police state of medicine

RE: The Police State of Medicine with Authors' Response

Author: 
Wayne A. Pickard, M.D.
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
November/December 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
6

Dear Editors,

I am an ardent member of AAPS. Can you please forward the comments below to Dr. Faria and Dr. Orient.

RE: The Police State of Medicine

Author: 
Russell L. Blaylock, MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
November/December 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
6

Dear Editor,

The Police State of Medicine - The Nature of the Beast

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
July/August 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
4

The AMA is proud to support this historic piece of legislation
[Kassebaum-Kennedy bill] and extends to all who joined our efforts
to have it enacted a heart-felt "thank you."

Daniel Johnson, AMA President
August 2, 1996

 

How to Retire Without Really Wanting To

Author: 
Charles Harris, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
July/August 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
4

Shortly after retiring, I was invited to become the third associate of two "retired" physicians conducting a walk-in practice dealing to a great extent with the medically indigent. Shortly thereafter, medical problems claimed my two associates and they quit: I continued solo five mornings a week.

A Personal Experience in the Criminal Justice System

Author: 
Tad Lonergan, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
July/August 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
4

Orange County Jail, Santa Ana, California
Brad Gates, Sheriff
Bookkeeping Number 91-347438

Innocence Is Irrelevant --- The Einaugler Case

Author: 
Gerald Einaugler, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
July/August 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
4

I am the first doctor in the history of the United States legal system criminally convicted for using medical judgment. My conviction in 1993 was for reckless endangerment and willful neglect (both misdemeanors and Health Code Violations) for ordering the transfer of a completely stable nursing home patient [to a hospital across the street] in the afternoon instead of the morning --- "a 10 hour delay" --- on Sunday, May 20, 1990. I was deemed negligent even though I examined the patient three times on that Sunday (7 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.).