neuroscience

The Unarmed Assailant—A Deadly Threat by Robert A. Margulies, MD, MPH

Journal/Website: 
Doctors for Responsible Gun Ownership (DRGO)
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Tuesday, February 16, 2016

A unifying principle of American law governing the defensive use of deadly force is that a victim may use such force when an attacker threatens violence capable of causing death or grave bodily harm. There is little doubt that it is justified when the robber draws and points a handgun at the victim.

Potentially lethal force may require defensive deadly force

Journal/Website: 
Doctors for Responsible Gun Ownership (DRGO)
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2016

The act of self-defense can have a double effect: the preservation of one's life;
and the killing of the aggressor...The one is intended, the other is not.
— Saint Thomas Aquinas

A book review of The Neuropsychiatry of Limbic and Subcortical Disorders

Journal/Website: 
Amazon.com
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Monday, July 27, 2015

Neuropsychiatry of Limbic and Subcortical DisordersThe material compiled in this slim but compact tome, The Neuropsychiatry of Limbis and Subcortical Disorders, was originally published in the Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience in 1997. It was expanded and republished in book form made possible by a grant from Hoechst Marion Roussel Pharmaceuticals.

Glyphosate, neurological diseases — and the scientific method

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Editorial
Published Date: 
Thursday, August 20, 2015

We must be careful not to rush to label glyphosate as excessively toxic to humans because when used properly and in proper quantities it is probably no more dangerous and toxic than other effective herbicides on the market. Unfortunately, most effective herbicides and insecticides could be classified as neurotoxic and carcinogenic because in high enough concentrations they can be toxic to biological systems.

Longevity and compression of morbidity from a neuroscience perspective: Do we have a duty to die by a certain age?

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Monday, March 30, 2015
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/longevity-and-compression-of-morbidity-from-a-neuroscience-perspective-do-we-have-a-duty-to-die-by-a-certain-age/

Abstract — The search for longevity, if not for immortality itself, has been as old as recorded history. The great strides made in the standard of living and the advances in scientific medicine, have resulted in unprecedented increases in longevity, concomitant with improved quality of life.

The road being paved to neuroethics: A path leading to bioethics or to neuroscience medical ethics?

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International & HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Editorial
Published Date: 
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/the-road-being-paved-to-neuroethics-a-path-leading-to-bioethics-or-to-neuroscience-medical-ethics/

Abstract — In 2013, U.S. President Barack Obama decreed the creation of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, as part of his $100 million Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative. In the wake of the work of this Commission, the purpose, goals, possible shortcomings, and even dangers are discussed, and the possible impact it may have upon neuroscience ethics (Neuroethics) both in clinical practice as well as scientific research.

Medical Ethics of Hippocrates or Population-Based Bioethics — A Symposium based on the Interview of Dr. Miguel A. Faria by Kerry Sheridan, Agence France-Presse

Journal/Website: 
Agence France-Presse
Article Type: 
Interview
Published Date: 
Thursday, May 15, 2014

This interview resulted in the May 14, 2014 article, "U.S. Experts urge focus on ethics in brain research" by Kerry Sheridan, AFP Correspondent. The article was distributed through the NewsCred Smartwire, Agence France Presse.

Kerry Sheridan, Agence France-Presse (AFP): Hi Dr. Faria, I'm working on a story about calls for consideration of ethics in neuroscience research, and I was wondering if I could interview you about your thoughts on the need for ethical oversight in neuroscience?

Curriculum Vitae for Miguel A. Faria, Jr., M.D.

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Published Date: 
Monday, January 1, 2007

CURRICULUM VITAE

MIGUEL A. FARIA, JR., M.D.

BORN: September 30, 1952 in Sancti Spiritus, Cuba
U.S. CITIZEN: 1971
FLUENT IN LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH: Spanish

EDUCATION:

* Eau Claire High School, Columbia, South Carolina (1970; National Honor Society)

* University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina (1970-1973). Bachelor of
   Science (B.S.) degree in Biology with a minor in Psychology (1973; graduated
   Magna Cum Laude)

On Psychosurgery and Mind Control — A Review of Miguel Faria's "Violence, Mental Illness and the Brain" by Russell L. Blaylock, M.D.

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Tuesday, September 3, 2013

In his three-part series on psychosurgery in America entitled "Violence, Mental Illness and the Brain," my friend, Dr. Miguel Faria, has written one of the best published summaries on the history of neurosurgical treatment of psychiatric disorders by selective sectioning or abolition of specific parts of the behavioral brain.

Violence, mental illness, and the brain – A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 3 – From deep brain stimulation to amygdalotomy for violent behavior, seizures, and pathological aggression in humans

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Abstract — In the final installment to this three-part, essay-editorial on psychosurgery, we relate the history of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in humans and glimpse the phenomenal body of work conducted by Dr. Jose Delgado at Yale University from the 1950s to the 1970s.

Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 2 — From the limbic system and cingulotomy to deep brain stimulation

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Saturday, June 1, 2013
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/violence-mental-illness-and-the-brain-a-brief-history-of-psychosurgery-part-2-from-the-limbic-system-and-cingulotomy-to-deep-brain-stimulation/

Abstract — Knowledge of neuroscience flourished during and in the wake of the era of frontal lobotomy, as a byproduct of psychosurgery in the late 1930s and 1940s, revealing fascinating neural pathways and neurophysiologic mechanisms of the limbic system for the formulation of emotions, memory, and human behavior. The creation of the Klüver‑Bucy syndrome in monkeys opened new horizons in the pursuit of knowledge in human behavior and neuropathology.

Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 1 — From trephination to lobotomy

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Friday, April 5, 2013
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/violence-mental-illness-and-the-brain-a-brief-history-of-psychosurgery-part-1-from-trephination-to-lobotomy/

Abstract — Psychosurgery was developed early in human prehistory (trephination) as a need perhaps to alter aberrant behavior and treat mental illness. The “American Crowbar Case" provided an impetus to study the brain and human behavior. The frontal lobe syndrome was avidly studied. Frontal lobotomy was developed in the 1930s for the treatment of mental illness and to solve the pressing problem of overcrowding in mental institutions in an era when no other forms of effective treatment were available. Lobotomy popularized by Dr.

Food Additive Excitotoxins and Degenerative Brain Disorders

Author: 
Russell L. Blaylock, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
November/December 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
6

There are a growing number of clinicians and basic scientists who are convinced that a group of compounds called excitotoxins play a critical role in the development of several neurological disorders including migraines, seizures, infections, abnormal neural development, certain endocrine disorders, neuropsychiatric disorders, learning disorders in children, AIDS dementia, episodic violence, lyme borreliosis, hepatic encephalopathy, specific types of obesity, and especially the neurodegenerative diseases, such as ALS, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and olivo

Tacrine in the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

Author: 
William K. Summers, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
January/February 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
1

ABSTRACT Tacrine (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-5-aminoacridine, THA, Cognex®) has had an interesting history since its synthesis in Australia as part of the WWII effort. In 1986, it was described in its oral form as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease. In 1993, it became the first FDA approved treatment for Alzheimer's, but this was not without controversy, and many practitioners believed the drug was ineffective and hepatotoxic.

The Sharp Edge of the Soul by George Chovanes, MD

Author: 
Reviewed by Del Meyer, MD
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Fall 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
3

Neurosurgeon George Chovanes, M.D., begins his writing career with an ambitious project involving science, neurosurgery, politics and mystery. The protagonist in The Sharp Edge of the Soul is chief neurosurgical resident, Dr. Alex Adams, who is suspect of the chief of neurosurgery, Dr. Victor Todd. Todd makes philosophical comments about the perennial neurosurgeon's preoccupation with the mind-brain dilemma --- he wishes to program the mind by altering the brain. Dr. Todd is researching this with monkeys. But is he also using humans?

Public health, social science, and the scientific method (Part II)

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology (World Neurosurgery)
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Thursday, March 1, 2007
Source: 
http://www.worldneurosurgery.org/article/S0090-3019(06)01079-2/fulltext

In Part I, we discussed in general terms some of the shortcomings I encountered in many of the grant proposals submitted during my stint as a grant reviewer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) in the years 2002-2004 [6]. There is no reason to believe that these epidemiologic and scientific shortcomings have been addressed and corrected in subsequent years.

Public health, social science, and the scientific method (Part I)

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology (World Neurosurgery)
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Saturday, February 3, 2007
Source: 
http://www.worldneurosurgery.org/article/S0090-3019(06)01080-9/fulltext

During the years 2002-2004, I served in the Injury Research Grant Review Committee (IRGRC, more recently the "Initial Review Group") of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - more specifically, the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).



Diary of Dreams performs at the 2016 M’era Luna festival in Hildesheim, Germany. M’era Luna, “one of the biggest dark music events in Germany,” is held each year on the second weekend in August. Close to 25,000 people attend the festival annually to hear gothic, metal and industrial music performed on two large festival-style stages.