medical history

Another medical journey to ancient Rome and Roman medicine with medical historian Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Monday, June 15, 2015

This is the third volume of the monumental A History of Medicine series by the medical historian and classical scholar Plinio Prioreschi M.D., PhD.[1] A limited number of these books were published, and the reader would be fortunate to find copies of the tomes for less than $350 U.S. dollars. We have already reviewed Volume I: Primitive and Ancient Medicine (2nd edition, 1995) and Volume II: Greek Medicine (2nd edition, 1996).[2,3] We found both of these tomes to be excellent journeys to the history of medicine (and indirectly medical ethics).

A journey through time to ancient Greek medicine with medical historian and classical scholar Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2015
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/a-journey-through-time-to-ancient-greek-medicine-with-medical-historian-and-classical-scholar-plinio-prioreschi-md-phd/

In our review of the first volume in this series we introduced the medical scholar Dr. Plinio Prioreschi, the author of this marvelous narrative of the history of medicine, and listed the composition of this series of tomes for the benefit of the readers.[1] We do so again here for the same reason:

Prioreschi Volume II Greek MedicineA History of Medicine — Volume I: Primitive and Ancient Medicine (2nd edition, 1995); 596 pages

A critique of Dr. Miguel Faria's book, Vandals at the Gates of Medicine. Reviewed by Dr. Russell L. Blaylock

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Wednesday, June 10, 2015

It is not often one comes across a book that contains so much useful and enlightening information and wisdom. In Vandals at the Gates of Medicine, Dr. Miguel Faria has captured the essence of our nation’s problem — collectivism. As he so forcefully points out, we have, as a people, abandoned the principles that made this a great nation, a nation of free and virtuous people.

A fascinating look at primitive and ancient medicine by medical historian and classical scholar Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Monday, May 25, 2015

Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD (1930–2014), the author of this monumental series of tomes on the history of medicine was an accomplished scholar — i.e., physician, scientist, linguist (of classical and several modern languages), pharmacologist, medical historian, and ethicist, as well as thinker, although he did not necessarily claim all of these accomplishments. Prioreschi completed his MD (1954) at the University of Pavia, Italy, and his PhD (1961) in experimental medicine at the University of Montreal.

Neolithic trepanation decoded — A unifying hypothesis: Has the mystery as to why primitive surgeons performed cranial surgery been solved?

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Editorial
Published Date: 
Thursday, May 7, 2015

Abstract — The perplexing mystery of why so many trephined skulls from the Neolithic period have been uncovered all over the world representing attempts at primitive cranial surgery is discussed. More than 1500 trephined skulls have been uncovered throughout the world, from Europe and Scandinavia to North America, from Russia and China to South America (particularly in Peru). Most reported series show that from 5-10% of all skulls found from the Neolithic period have been trephined with single or multiple skull openings of various sizes.

A history of medicine from a secular humanist perspective!

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Friday, March 20, 2015

The Story of Medicine by Victor Robinson, MDThe Story of Medicine by Victor Robinson, M.D. The New Home Library, New York; 1943. Bibliographical Notes, Indexed, 564 pages.

Forgotten lessons on medical history for medical students

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Monday, March 9, 2015

A Prelude to Medical History (1961) by Dr. Félix Martí-Ibáñez (1911-1972) is a short but interesting book on medical history based on a series of lectures to an entering class of medical students, who the author welcomes with excitement and jubilation. Martí-Ibáñez emphasizes such traits as greatness with humility and compassion with learning in medical ethics and the history of medicine. As foundations upon which to build the profession, he lists clinical practice, teaching, and research.

On Psychosurgery and Mind Control — A Review of Miguel Faria's "Violence, Mental Illness and the Brain" by Russell L. Blaylock, M.D.

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Tuesday, September 3, 2013

In his three-part series on psychosurgery in America entitled "Violence, Mental Illness and the Brain," my friend, Dr. Miguel Faria, has written one of the best published summaries on the history of neurosurgical treatment of psychiatric disorders by selective sectioning or abolition of specific parts of the behavioral brain.

Violence, mental illness, and the brain – A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 3 – From deep brain stimulation to amygdalotomy for violent behavior, seizures, and pathological aggression in humans

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Abstract — In the final installment to this three-part, essay-editorial on psychosurgery, we relate the history of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in humans and glimpse the phenomenal body of work conducted by Dr. Jose Delgado at Yale University from the 1950s to the 1970s.

Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 2 — From the limbic system and cingulotomy to deep brain stimulation

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Saturday, June 1, 2013
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/violence-mental-illness-and-the-brain-a-brief-history-of-psychosurgery-part-2-from-the-limbic-system-and-cingulotomy-to-deep-brain-stimulation/

Abstract — Knowledge of neuroscience flourished during and in the wake of the era of frontal lobotomy, as a byproduct of psychosurgery in the late 1930s and 1940s, revealing fascinating neural pathways and neurophysiologic mechanisms of the limbic system for the formulation of emotions, memory, and human behavior. The creation of the Klüver‑Bucy syndrome in monkeys opened new horizons in the pursuit of knowledge in human behavior and neuropathology.

Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 1 — From trephination to lobotomy

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Friday, April 5, 2013
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/violence-mental-illness-and-the-brain-a-brief-history-of-psychosurgery-part-1-from-trephination-to-lobotomy/

Abstract — Psychosurgery was developed early in human prehistory (trephination) as a need perhaps to alter aberrant behavior and treat mental illness. The “American Crowbar Case" provided an impetus to study the brain and human behavior. The frontal lobe syndrome was avidly studied. Frontal lobotomy was developed in the 1930s for the treatment of mental illness and to solve the pressing problem of overcrowding in mental institutions in an era when no other forms of effective treatment were available. Lobotomy popularized by Dr.

Epidemic Diseases and Public Health

Journal/Website: 
Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia
Article Type: 
Editorial
Published Date: 
Wednesday, May 3, 1995

And I looked, and behold, a pale horse; and his name that sat on him was Death.
Revelation 6:8

Stalin's Mysterious Death

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Monday, November 14, 2011
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/stalins-mysterious-death/

For weeks, Joseph Stalin had been plagued with dizzy spells and high blood pressure. His personal physician, Professor V. N. Vinogradov had advised that Stalin step down as head of the government for health reasons. That was not what Stalin wanted to hear from the good doctor. Soon the Professor would pay for this temerity and indiscretion with his arrest and alleged involvement in the infamous Doctor's Plot (dyelo vrachey).

Book Review of Medical Warrior: Fighting Corporate Socialized Medicine. Reviewed by Conrad F. Meier

Journal/Website: 
The Freeman — Ideas on Liberty
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Tuesday, December 1, 1998
Source: 
http://www.thefreemanonline.org/book-reviews/book-review-medical-warrior-by-miguel-a-faria-jr-md/

Warning! If you have high blood pressure, consult your physician before reading Medical Warrior. Dr. Miguel Faria writes with such fervor and conviction about the looming dangers of a health-care system dominated by big government, big business, and big labor that people with medical problems may wish to read something far less provocative.

History in Medicine

Author: 
Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
Winter 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
1

Dear Dr. Faria,

The Serpent on the Staff: The Unhealthy Politics of the American Medical Association by Howard Wolinsky and Tom Brune

Author: 
Reviewed by Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD, FCCP
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Summer 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
2

Written by two reporters, this book contains a wealth of information about the history and inner workings of the American Medical Association since its founding in 1847. It is divided into two parts. The first covers how the AMA is organized, the history of its development, its ongoing battle against compulsory health insurance, a description of its political action committee (AMPAC), and a discussion of its support for the business ethic. The second covers the AMA's response to health issues including alternative medicine, the tobacco problem, abortion, and the AIDS epidemic.

On Ethics, Guidelines, and Medical Progress

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Summer 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
2

It will be of little avail ---- if the laws are so voluminous
that they can not be read or are so incoherent
that they can not be understood
--- Or undergo
such incessant changes that no man who
knows the law today can guess what
it will be tomorrow.
The Federalist Papers.

Vandals At The Gates of Medicine --- Historic Perspectives on The Battle Over Health Care Reform by Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD

Author: 
Reviewed by Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD, FCCP
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Fall 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
3

Dr. Miguel A. Faria, Jr., who is a consultant neurosurgeon, Adjunct Professor of Medical History (1993-1996) at Mercer University School of Medicine, and editor-in-chief of the Medical Sentinel of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, has combined astute political insight with his encyclopedic knowledge of history to create this unique blend of historical perspective and political commentary, with its emphasis on the history of medicine and medical ethics.

The Hippocratic Oath, Abortion, Greek Homosexuality, and the Courts

Author: 
Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Spring 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
2


The Hippocratic Oath, Abortion, and the U.S. Supreme Court

Medical Warrior --- Fighting Corporate Socialized Medicine by Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD

Author: 
Reviewed by Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD, FCCP
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Fall 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
4

Because of the recent decline in our health care system, today's physicians practice in a "medical gulag" and suffer from a "siege mentality." The reasons for this, as learned from examples in both ancient and recent history, are the topics for this unique collection of essays which are divided into five sections: "lessons from history"; "medical ecology"; "towards collectivism in medicine"; "the role of public health"; and "managed care, corporate socialized medicine and medical ethics." The author, Miguel A.

Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time (Part I): Medical Ethics and Statist Controls

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
January/February 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
1

In matters of style, swim with the current;
in matters of principle, stand firm like a rock.

Thomas Jefferson

 

The Corporate Practice of Medicine

Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time (Part II): Medical Ethics and Organized Medicine

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
March/April 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
2

The physician should be contemptuous of money, interested in his work,
self-controlled, and just. Once he is possessed of these basic virtues,
he will have all others at his command as well.

Galen

 

Can the Medical Profession Survive Flexible Ethics?*

The Oath of Hippocrates --- Is It Relevant?

Author: 
Franklin E. Payne, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
March/April 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
2

The crisis of American medicine is not tobacco, AIDS, silicone implants, the Gulf War Syndrome, breast or other forms of cancer, physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, licensure, medical care for the poor, or any other specific medical or ethical issue. The crisis of American medicine is far greater than any one of these problems, indeed it is far greater than all of them combined, because the answers to these problems do not come from within them but from medical ethics.

Onward To Obscurantism!

Author: 
Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

*This article is excerpted from the Foreword of Dr. Prioreschi's latest volume (Vol. III --- Roman Medicine) of his A History of Medicine, released this year.(1)

For The Patient's Own Good --- The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care by Edmund D. Pellegrino, MD and David C. Thomasma, PhD

Author: 
Reviewed by Delbert H. Meyer, MD
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
May/June 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
3

Dr Pellegrino, professor of Medicine and Medical Humanities at Georgetown, is joined by Dr Thomasma, Professor of Medical Ethics at Loyola in Chicago, in reviewing the post-Hippocratic era, which has shaken and even dismantled portions of the ethics of Hippocrates. Pellegrino feels there have been more changes in medical ethics in the last two decades than in its twenty-five-hundred-year history. There is serious question about whether the medical profession can ever again be united under a common set of moral commitments.

America's 30 Years War --- Who is Winning? by Balint Vazsonyi

Author: 
Reviewed by Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
March/April 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
2

America's founding principles have been subverted and our country is on a steady course toward socialism. Our four founding principles --- the rule of law, individual rights, the guarantee of private property, and a common American identity --- are being replaced by group rights, redistribution, entitlements, and multi-culturalism, and our entire Western culture is in serious jeopardy. This is the message Hungarian-born Balint Vazsonyi, a world renowned concert pianist and historian, brings us based on his encyclopedic knowledge of the past.

Vaccines (Part II): Hygiene, Sanitation, Immunization, and Pestilential Diseases

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
March/April 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
2

Vaccines --- Kill or Cure?

As the controversial debate over mandatory vaccine policy heats up igniting passions, it is perhaps appropriate we summarize what is known about the manifest benefits of modern vaccines, not forgetting the tremendously salutary impact on health and longevity wrought about by better living conditions, hygiene and sanitation, in general, and the introduction and subsequent widespread use of antibiotics, in particular.

The Nazi War on Tobacco and Cancer

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
November/December 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
6

I was recently asked to review The Nazi War on Cancer by Robert N. Proctor for Ideas on Liberty. What follows here is a more extended critique of this scholarly but deeply disturbing book.

The Nazi War on Tobacco and Cancer

Author: 
W. Patrick Flanagan, Jr., MD, FACS
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
Spring 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
1

Dear Editor,
In your excellent review of Robert N. Proctor's book, The Nazi War on Cancer (Medical Sentinel, November/December 2000), you postulate that the drop-off in stomach cancer in the earlier 20th Century was possibly related to better methods of meat curing and preservation.



Fransini Giraldo is a Colombian girl who dances her own style of Salsa. In this video, she dances to the rhythm of Sonora Carruseles de Colombia, presumably in the Colombia countryside. Published July 16, 2013.