health care

Faria: ObamaCare — Toward Free Market or Socialized Medicine?

Journal/Website: 
GOPUSA.com
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Monday, September 26, 2011

In a recent letter to the editor published in my local newspaper, the Macon Telegraph (9/16/11), Jack Bernard, a self-described "Republican,” retired health care executive, was "disconcerted by the ideological free market rigidity” that he observed during a debate by the Republican presidential candidates concerning “the health care reform question.”

RE: “Irradiating the Mail and Food” with Dr. Orient's Reply

Author: 
William J. Rea, MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
Summer 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
2

Dear Editor,
I was shocked and sorry that you published a biased article on how we need to irradiate food. This is another failing industry that has lived on government subsidies since its inception, looking for an outlet for their business. Common sense defies the use of radiation in our food supply. We have enough contamination in our food supply as it is. The author states that the AMA and World Health Organization supports irradiation. This in itself should be enough evidence to keep us from irradiating our foods.

William J. Rea, MD
Dallas, TX

Hippocratic Oath: Discarded Relic or Living Soul of Medicine?

Author: 
Donald J. Palmisano, MD, JD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
March/April 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
2

The Hippocratic Oath — Is it relevant today or does it belong in the scrap heap of history’s discarded relics?

I submit it is relevant today. I submit it is a touchstone that offers a moral compass — an ethical framework — for navigation through these times of crisis. In short, it is the soul of medicine.

Managed Truth: The Great Danger to Our Republic

Author: 
Russell L. Blaylock, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
November/December 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
6

French social critic Frederic Bastiat (1801-1850) once said, “The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended.”(1) During much of the history of our republic, our intellectuals and those who digest these ideas for consumption by the general public, did a poor job of defending the basic foundations of our freedom. Until the sixties, it was taken for granted that private property, absolute moral principles, and free enterprise were desirable.

To the Tune of Washington's Pied Pipers

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Fall 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
3

In A.D. 1212, a Children's Crusade was formed allegedly
to rescue the Holy Sepulcher. Instead, the children were
lured and sold into slavery by unscrupulous and cruel
traders. Thousands of innocent children died of hunger
and disease and from their brutal ordeal. It is said that
the legend of the Pied Piper of Hamelin, who led
the children by the tune of his pipe,
derives from this dreadful affair.

News Capsules (January/February 1999)

Author: 
Compiled by Medical Sentinel Editors
Article Type: 
News Capsules
Issue: 
January/February 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
1

Canadian Health Care


While Canadian physicians have been going on strike protesting the deterioration of medical care which continues to be rationed for Canadian citizens --- Canada's defense department confirmed on Sept. 2 that the military has agreed to pay for sex-change operations.

Psychological Characteristics of the Private Practitioner

Author: 
Edward Sodaro, Jr., MD and Jennifer Ball, CSW
Article Type: 
Report from the States
Issue: 
March/April 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
2

Twelve health care practitioners with a commitment to private practice were interviewed to determine common factors in attitude and motivation. Interviewed were 8 physicians, two psychologists, one dentist, and one psychiatric social worker. All were from New York except for one each from Virginia and California. Seven of the professionals studied received less than 50 percent of their practice income from managed care and five had no managed care contracts.

Psychological characteristics present included:

Minnesota's New Health Commissioner Effectiveness Questioned

Author: 
Twila Brase, RN
Article Type: 
Report from the States
Issue: 
May/June 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
3

Jan Malcolm, Vice President of Public Affairs for the Allina Health System, Minnesota's largest HMO, was appointed on January 19 as Minnesota's new Commissioner of Health. We question whether Commissioner Malcolm, a top-ranking HMO executive, can effectively deal with the problem of managed care.

News and Analysis (May/June 1999)

Author: 
Lawrence R. Huntoon, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
News and Analysis
Issue: 
May/June 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
3

Monkey Medicine and Clinical Pathways

Well, it's official. Physicians who practice medicine in hospitals that have implemented "Clinical Pathways" no longer have to think. All they have to do is "follow the yellow brick road." Patients will be issued a pair of ruby slippers on admission and taught to recite "there's no place like home" so as to insure that they don't overstay their welcome (i.e., allotted DRG time).

News Capsules (May/June 1999)

Author: 
Compiled by Medical Sentinel Editors
Article Type: 
News Capsules
Issue: 
May/June 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
3

Doctors for Disaster Preparedness (DDP)

RE: The Health Care System as a Dysfunctional Family

Author: 
Lawrence A. Dunegan, MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
May/June 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
3

Dr. John Sonne's article, "The Health Care System as a Dysfunctional Family" (Medical Sentinel, Vol. 4, No. 1), was right on target. Among the many cogent ideas he expressed was the importance of recognizing the misuse of words, and the subtle alteration in thinking which results therefrom. I would like to bring attention to additional examples of the misuse of words serving to alter people's perceptions of themselves and their relationships with others.

Wall Street Journal Letter and Market Forces

Author: 
Kathleen J. Burch, PsyD, RN
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
November/December 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
6

Dear Dr. Faria,
I obtained your address from directory assistance so that I could write to you and express my appreciation for your letter of July 23, 1999 to The Wall Street Journal.

I, too, have long believed that the best way out of the current mess is to make either all or none of health care expenses tax deductible, and to end the fiction that health insurance is a free "benefit" from employers, rather than representing compensation that might be much more wisely spent if the employee were in charge of it.

Immortality and Medical Innovation

Author: 
Lawrence Cranberg, MD
Article Type: 
Commentary
Issue: 
November/December 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
6

An eminent medical scientist, Prof. Emil J. Freireich of the University of Texas Cancer Center of the M. D. Anderson Hospital in Houston, Texas, tossed off casually over lunch a few months ago the comment, "Of course we are immortal. All we have to do is eliminate all the causes of death."

Vaccines (Part I): Jenner, Pasteur, and the Dawn of Scientific Medicine

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
March/April 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
2

Introduction

Vaccines (Part II): Hygiene, Sanitation, Immunization, and Pestilential Diseases

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
March/April 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
2

Vaccines --- Kill or Cure?

As the controversial debate over mandatory vaccine policy heats up igniting passions, it is perhaps appropriate we summarize what is known about the manifest benefits of modern vaccines, not forgetting the tremendously salutary impact on health and longevity wrought about by better living conditions, hygiene and sanitation, in general, and the introduction and subsequent widespread use of antibiotics, in particular.

Denial of the Soul --- Spiritual and Medical Perspectives on Euthanasia and Mortality by M. Scott Peck, MD

Author: 
Reviewed by Delbert H. Meyer, MD
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
May/June 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
3

Physician, psychiatrist, theologian, and author of the bestseller, The Road Less Traveled, M. Scott Peck, M.D., gives us an in-depth look at the current euthanasia movement and its origins in the inability of physicians to "pull the plug." Peck states that although Dr. Kevorkian gives him the shivers, he must credit him more than any other individual for the genesis of this book. Almost single-handedly over the past five years, Kevorkian has turned the debate over euthanasia into a national issue within the United States.

Cuban Psychiatry --- The Perversion of Medicine

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
September/October 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
5

The Politics of Psychiatry in Revolutionary Cuba by Charles J. Brown and Armando M. Lago,(1) the subject of this issue's Editor's Corner, only came to my attention because its documentation value was mentioned in two special issues of The New American magazine chronicling the Elián González saga,(2,3) the story of the six-year-old Cuban boy who had been a point of contention between the Cuban-American community in Miami who wanted him to stay in American freedom, on the one hand, and the U.S.

Regarding NEJM Editorial Stance

Author: 
Kathryn A. Serkes
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
September/October 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
5

Dear Wall Street Journal Editor,
Restoring the erosion of the public's confidence in the practice of medicine must be the foremost priority of the new editor of The New England Journal of Medicine in light of questions about the objectivity of recently published articles ("NEJM Appoints Drazen as Editor in Chief," 5/11/00).

Castro's "Doctor Diplomacy"

Author: 
Virgilio Beato-Núñez, MD, Enrique Cantón, MD, Gladys Cárdenas, DO, José Carro, MD, et al
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
September/October 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
5

Introduction

Help To Insure Our Future

Author: 
Michael C. Vidas, MD
Article Type: 
Report from the States
Issue: 
Spring 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
1

To insure the future of our Peoria County Medical Society, we keep our current members and recruit new members. To this end, we can look at what has recently transpired.

We have finally been able to give our membership the choice of national medical society membership. They can now choose to be a member of the American Medical Association (AMA) or the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS), as well as their specialty organizations to represent them at the national level.

News Capsules (Spring 2001)

Author: 
Compiled by Medical Sentinel Editors
Article Type: 
News Capsules
Issue: 
Spring 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
1

Big Brother is Watching You


"Render the following in B-movie, staccato-style German and see if it reminds you of anything:

'Your vehicle was seen traveling on southbound I-95 near I-195 on Wednesday, Sept. 27. Please provide the following information:

'Where were you going? Who was with you? What was the purpose of your trip?'

Ritalin --- Pharmaceutical Blackmail

Author: 
Philip Ranheim, MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
Summer 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
2

Dear Editor,

I enjoyed the article by Vin Suprynowicz entitled, "Ritalin -- Pharmaceutical Blackmail." The economic, political and moral dimensions are most interesting and rather disturbing. What is happening when state agencies overrule family care of children except in the most extreme situations?

Medicine and the Promise of the Internet

Author: 
David A. Westbrock, MD, FACP, FACE
Article Type: 
Commentary
Issue: 
Summer 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
2

Nothing is so invigorating to the American consciousness as freedom. It is the lifeblood of our nation, as in Lincoln's Gettysburg Address --- "conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal." It is of great importance, then, that the public pay close attention to how they handle the promise of the Internet, the engine that is driving our long economic boom.

The Past, Present and Future of Aging

Author: 
Conrad F. Meier
Article Type: 
Editorial
Issue: 
Fall 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
3

In response to one of my columns on health care, a reader wrote and called me an "old geezer" ranting in opposition to universal health care. I confess to having a healthy discontent for the way things are, but I have to draw the line at being called an "old geezer." Having just turned the corner on 66 got me to thinking about ageism --- an ignorant practice of judging people on the basis of age rather than the ability to perform.

 

Putting This in Perspective

 

Healthcare Online for Dummies by Howard Wolinsky and Judi Wolinsky

Author: 
Reviewed by Delbert H. Meyer, MD
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Spring 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
1

The For Dummies® computer book series is written for frustrated computer users who know they aren't dumb, but find the PC and its vocabulary make them feel helpless. This compact volume helps sort out the extensive healthcare sites.

The Wolinskys caution you in using the web: never use it for emergencies. However, to better equip you to prepare for emergencies, it directs you to the American College of Emergency Physicians' site at http://www.acep.org.

Cuba in Revolution --- Escape From a Lost Paradise by Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD

Author: 
Reviewed by Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Summer 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
2

Thirty-six years ago after a harrowing ordeal at sea, Miguel A. Faria, Jr., escaped from Cuba with his father and found a new home in the United States. Cuba's loss was America's gain. A consummate historian, Dr. Faria here applies himself with gusto, using a treasure-trove of inside information to tell his personal odyssey and to reveal the true story of the Cuban Revolution and its sell-out to communism. Especially noteworthy are the unknown stories of the Cuban patriots who fought Castro's communist regime.

Faria: Getting US in Line for ObamaCare and Medical Rationing!

Journal/Website: 
GOPUSA.com
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Thursday, March 18, 2010

The final word from medical moguls and other pundits is coming out in full force on health care and medical journalism: Americans must be prepared, from the top down, to accept drastic medical and health care rationing. Why? Because "the establishment of the rational allocation of finite resources" (translate: the extensive rationing of medical services) will be desperately needed, if universal coverage, socialized ObamaCare medicine is to have a chance to work in this country.



Rumors continue 60 years after Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin's death. Did he die as a result of a stroke or was he assassinated by a member or members of his inner circle?