aggression

The Dallas shooting of police officers: What it really means by Russell L. Blaylock, M.D.

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Sunday, July 17, 2016

The common man could sense that a change was passing over the nation, that something in the soul of the people was dying, that a pristine state of simplicity, likened to that of our first parents, was being destroyed by the forces of an active evil.”[1] 

Even in Brussels, blame the victim by David C. Stolinsky, MD

Journal/Website: 
www.stolinsky.com
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Friday, April 1, 2016

In the United States, we play baseball. In the United Kingdom, they play cricket. But everywhere, people play blame-the-victim. Anyone can play — no skill or knowledge is required. It’s easy to play — there are no rules.

The Unarmed Assailant—A Deadly Threat by Robert A. Margulies, MD, MPH

Journal/Website: 
Doctors for Responsible Gun Ownership (DRGO)
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Tuesday, February 16, 2016

A unifying principle of American law governing the defensive use of deadly force is that a victim may use such force when an attacker threatens violence capable of causing death or grave bodily harm. There is little doubt that it is justified when the robber draws and points a handgun at the victim.

Potentially lethal force may require defensive deadly force

Journal/Website: 
Doctors for Responsible Gun Ownership (DRGO)
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2016

The act of self-defense can have a double effect: the preservation of one's life;
and the killing of the aggressor...The one is intended, the other is not.
— Saint Thomas Aquinas

Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 2 — From the limbic system and cingulotomy to deep brain stimulation

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Saturday, June 1, 2013
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/violence-mental-illness-and-the-brain-a-brief-history-of-psychosurgery-part-2-from-the-limbic-system-and-cingulotomy-to-deep-brain-stimulation/

Abstract — Knowledge of neuroscience flourished during and in the wake of the era of frontal lobotomy, as a byproduct of psychosurgery in the late 1930s and 1940s, revealing fascinating neural pathways and neurophysiologic mechanisms of the limbic system for the formulation of emotions, memory, and human behavior. The creation of the Klüver‑Bucy syndrome in monkeys opened new horizons in the pursuit of knowledge in human behavior and neuropathology.

Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 1 — From trephination to lobotomy

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Friday, April 5, 2013
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/violence-mental-illness-and-the-brain-a-brief-history-of-psychosurgery-part-1-from-trephination-to-lobotomy/

Abstract — Psychosurgery was developed early in human prehistory (trephination) as a need perhaps to alter aberrant behavior and treat mental illness. The “American Crowbar Case" provided an impetus to study the brain and human behavior. The frontal lobe syndrome was avidly studied. Frontal lobotomy was developed in the 1930s for the treatment of mental illness and to solve the pressing problem of overcrowding in mental institutions in an era when no other forms of effective treatment were available. Lobotomy popularized by Dr.



Diary of Dreams performs at the 2016 M’era Luna festival in Hildesheim, Germany. M’era Luna, “one of the biggest dark music events in Germany,” is held each year on the second weekend in August. Close to 25,000 people attend the festival annually to hear gothic, metal and industrial music performed on two large festival-style stages.