Published Articles

Sunday, May 3, 1998

Thomas Jefferson once admonished us that "the natural progression of things is for liberty to yield and for government to gain ground." In this, as in his many other admonitions to posterity, he was immensely correct. Georgia was one of several states like Colorado, Texas, and California to implement a fingerprint requirement for obtaining a driver's license. A recent report in The American Sentinel (issue #613; Editor: Lee Bellinger, P.O. Box 12497, Charlotte, NC 28220-2497 ) reveals that universal fingerprinting has been directed from Washington through the state departments of motor vehicles (DMV).

As happened here in Georgia, implementation of DMV fingerprinting was portrayed as a state issue rather than a federal mandate and an assault on privacy, and it was passed swiftly before the public could be mobilized to oppose it.

Now we learn that buried on page 650 of the national defense bill (H.R. 3610), which passed overwhelmingly by the House of Representatives on September 28, 1996, "each states' department of motor vehicle will require fingerprinting (or other forms of 'biometric' identification) as a condition of obtaining a driver's license, no later than...

Keyword(s): freedom


Monday, March 16, 1998

During President Clinton's first term, a vigorous offensive was launched under the name "Health Security Act of 1993," the goal of which was to deliver into the hands of the federal government the entire health care system of the United States. Fortunately, that undertaking was defeated, thanks to the resistance of the American people who made it clear that they did not want the central government exercising such comprehensive dominion over something so crucial as health care. However, though our adversaries appeared to fall back in defeat, we see in Dr. Faria's Medical Warrior that in actual fact they simply resolved to pursue their final goal by more subtle means.

This volume is a collection of 27 essays, written to expose a major threat to the American health care system every bit as serious as straightforward socialized medicine. Big government, ever eager for limitless power, and monopolistic-minded corporate medicine, athirst for government-sanctioned gain, are now acting in concert to bring about a health care revolution incrementally, by regulatory means, having failed to do it in one huge leap. The system they have devised is called "managed care" or "managed...

Keyword(s): socialized medicine


Sunday, March 1, 1998

Very few American adults now recall the high status once enjoyed by physicians in this land. They did not, of course, accomplish this on their own: their forbears in Europe spent generations at the task. The climb was not easy, for the aristocracy had all the weapons and the power and the prestige and the positions. But the French Revolution began the dislodging of the aristocrats from the heights. The proverbial bad wind, in other words, did blow some good. It dislodged the iron grip of hereditary privilege, and created gaps through which rising talents did climb aloft.

Physicians followed lawyers in creating a professional class with special rights of its own. Their fees were their own to set, their methods were devised within their own ranks, their failures were not, in the main, questioned, and their prestige rose as their links with science expanded. The entry of physicians into the treatment of mental disorders expanded medicine into new therapeutic avenues that combined to expand both law and the courts. By the twenties American physicians seemed to enjoy the best of all worlds, professionally speaking.

All that has amazingly changed. The situation of...

Keyword(s): socialized medicine


Tuesday, February 17, 1998

Dr. Miguel Faria is very proud of his adopted the United States of America. He's equally as proud to have received the Americanism medal and certificate from the Daughters of the American Revolution last month.

Faria, a native of Cuba, moved to Macon in 1983 after completing his training in neurosurgery at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. He moved to Macon to work as a neurosurgeon at Coliseum Medical Centers. When he came to interview at the hospital, Faria said he saw a bumper sticker on a car that read, "Freedom with Responsibility." Then he saw the same sticker on another car. That was a sign to him that Macon was the place he should be, he said.

Faria is a noted neurosurgeon who edits journals, publishes and is the author of two books, Vandals at the Gates of Medicine and Medical Warrior. However, it was his devotion to community service --- and particularly his love of American history --- that caught the attention of the DAR.

(Pictured above: Mrs. Anne McKinley, Regent, Nathaniel Macon Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) presents Americanism Medal to Dr. Miguel A. Faria, Jr.)

The...

Keyword(s): history


Friday, August 15, 1997

Despite all the media hullabaloo about a growing medical marketplace and the supposedly conservative changes being brought about by the November 1994 Republican revolution, corporate socialized medicine is making headway and becoming a reality, step-by-step, under the rubric of managed care and a mislabeled "free market."

The fact is we still face an ominous threat from those who seek to destroy the noble profession of medicine, enslave the healers, and dispose of those whose quality of life they deem not worth living.

The supremacy of the patient-doctor relationship, and the ability of physicians to do all they can for their patients is being increasingly challenged (and likely will continue to be challenged in the uncertain future of the 21st century), unless we prevail in derailing the juggernaut of managed care/HMO and corporatism.

Today, many of the major health care corporations with their burgeoning networks are acting in collusion with government bureaucrats to impose managed care and to subvert the time-honored ethics of the medical profession. Where once the supreme medical ethic dictated that physicians place their individual patients' interest...



Sunday, June 1, 1997

As we ponder the destructive changes unfolding today in health care and medical practice, we find ourselves questioning whether the government push and attempted takeover of the health care industry was truly repulsed by the American people following the consummation of the great health care debate of 1993 and 1994.

Despite all the media hullabaloo about a growing medical marketplace and the supposedly conservative changes brought about by the November 1994 Republican revolution, corporate socialized medicine is making headway, becoming a reality, step-by-step under the rubric of managed care and a mislabeled "free market." The fact is that we still face an ominous threat from those who seek to destroy the noble profession of medicine, enslave the healers, and dispose of those whose quality of life they deem not worth living.

The supremacy of the patient-doctor relationship, and the ability of physicians, including practicing dermatologists, to do all they can for their patients is being increasingly challenged (and likely will continue to be challenged in the uncertain future of the 21st Century), unless we prevail in derailing the juggernaut of managed...



Monday, September 30, 1996

A major engagement in the war over the right to keep and bear arms was fought in the House of Representatives this past July. The House voted to shift $2.6 million away from the National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) - a research unit of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) - and earmark the funds for other health research projects. The funding was equivalent to the amount spent by the NCIPC in its campaign to redefine guns as "first and foremost, a public health menace."

In a letter to House colleagues, Representative Jay Dickey (R-AR), who sponsored the amendment to redirect the NCIPC funding, explained that "NCIPC's director of the division of violence preventionhas this to say about the political agenda at NCIPC: "What we have to do is find a socially acceptable form of gun control." In a letter to Senator Arlen Spector (R-PA), who chairs the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education of the Senate Appropriations Committee, several senators who support the effort to curtail NCIPC's anti-gun activities noted NCIPC Director Mark Rosenberg's vision of "a long-term campaignto convince Americans that guns are, first and foremost,...



Friday, March 15, 1996

The book, Vandals at the Gates of Medicine by Miguel A. Faria, Jr., M.D., is extremely interesting and unusual as it takes you through the history of primitive medicine, from the Ice Age 40,000 years ago to the Renaissance, in an attempt to solve the battle over health care reform that is now taking place.

The author speculates that organized medical care was needed, and is hypothetical about the first blunt head injury (the author is a neurosurgeon). That man recognized “the need for the care of the wounded in his clan and when he became ill from imbibing the stagnant water of a polluted pond, he also recognized the need to be provided with aid and comfort during sickness — and to be nurtured back to health.” These witch doctors had a tremendous amount of prestige and power within the tribe and were respected, as the survival of the tribe depended on them.

The author now takes the reader to the Egyptian physicians in the fifth century B.C. by quoting Herodotus, a great historian: “The art of medicine is thus divided among them. Each physician applies himself to only one disease, and no more.” Apparently, there was specialization in those days....



Thursday, June 1, 1995

"Violence in America — Effective Soutions" by Suter EA, Waters WC, Murray GB, et al. was originally published in the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia, Volume 85, June 1995, pp 253-263 while Dr. Miguel A. Faria served as Editor-in-Chief of that medical journal. The following link is provided for readers who wish to read the entire article: http://rkba.org/research/suter/violence.html.



Wednesday, May 3, 1995

And I looked, and behold, a pale horse; and his name that sat on him was Death.
Revelation 6:8

At the peak of his reign in A.D. 540, after accomplishing major political, judicial, and military successes, Justinian’s empire was struck by the old enemy of mankind, one that not even Justinian could conquer: pestilential disease. The bubonic plague, which struck with a vengeance in A.D. 540, is justifiably the worst recorded pandemic to ever afflict humanity. Records regarding the dimensions of the devastation, suffering, and death were carefully kept by Justinian’s chief archivist, secretary and historian, Procopius....

At the time the horrible plague struck, Justinian was engaged in a war that was being waged fiercely on two fronts. We have already described the military feats of his armies as they battled the remnants of the Germanic tribes in the West. But during the years A.D. 541 and 542, Justinian was also engaged in the East fighting the recalcitrant Parthians....

If we think of the dimensions of the devastation of the bubonic plague of the 6th Century in the midst of the Dark Ages—the savage imperial wars waged against...





Diary of Dreams performs at the 2016 M’era Luna festival in Hildesheim, Germany. M’era Luna, “one of the biggest dark music events in Germany,” is held each year on the second weekend in August. Close to 25,000 people attend the festival annually to hear gothic, metal and industrial music performed on two large festival-style stages.