The Ten Greatest Adventurers in History

Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Tuesday, April 1, 2014
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Exclusive Hacienda Publishing

Inspired by the incredible adventures of various historical figures and finally spurred on by the book, Prince Rupert — The Last Cavalier (2007) by Charles Spencer, which I recently read and reviewed — I have compiled a brief list of arguably the ten most adventuresome characters of history.

Adventuresome here requires an explanation: Audacity in more than one area of historical pursuit in physical adventure, as well as other activities or intellectual pursuits. By this I mean, for example, that charismatic heads of state, such as Robespierre, Mao, Stalin, or Hitler, do not qualify because their rise to power, despotic careers, conquests, and brutal rules are all involved in the same vein — the attainment and preservation of political power. The converse is also true for true republican heroes, who gained power and ruled for the best, such as George Washington and Winston Churchill; or wholly benevolent figures, such as Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch, who belong on humanitarian lists. By the same token, great generals of history, whose virtually sole claim to fame is the result of purely exercising military prowess, such as Napoleon, Hannibal, Alexander the Great, or Scipio Africanus, do not qualify.

The men I list below are those who lived exceptional lives, conducted remarkable adventures, and possibly exerted themselves in multifaceted careers within various fields of interest. Thus, in increasing order of significance, here are the heroes (and possibly anti-heroes) who made it onto my list:

Prince Eugene of Savoy10. Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663-1736) — He was a Prince of the House of Savoy and superlative general who served in the armies of the Holy Roman Empire, virtually during this empire's last sparks of glory. Not only was he one of the great military commanders of history but, serving with John Churchill, the Duke of Marlborough, Prince Eugene stopped the imperialism of the "Sun King," Louis XIV of France. He led an adventuresome military career and also fought and defeated the Turks, leading successfully the Austrian armies in the War of the Polish succession (1733-1735). A contender for this post would include Don John of Austria, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V's illegitimate son and King Philip II of Spain's step brother and the victor of the decisive Battle of Lepanto in 1571.
 
Sidney Reilly9. Sidney Reilly (1873-1925) — Reilly was a Russian born, English secret agent who fought against the Bolsheviks during the early period of the Russian Revolution of 1917. Reilly worked for Scotland Yard and then MI6 with the journalist-spy Robin Bruce Lockhart and the revolutionary Boris Savinkov, an underground figure of the militant Social Revolutionary Party in Russia, intriguing to overthrow the communist government of Lenin. Before that, Reilly had numerous adventures working, not only as a capitalist entrepreneur, but also as a spy for various nations, yet always remaining loyal to the British. In the end, he was trapped by the Bolsheviks in the "false flag" Operation Trust, conducted by the secret police, Cheka, in which he, like Savinkov, was captured and executed by the communists. He is one of the models Ian Fleming used for the creation of the fictitious character, James Bond. Despite his ultimate failure, Reilly "Ace of Spies" is considered one of the greatest spies of the 20th century.

Hernan Cortes8. Hernán Cortés (1485-1547) — Cortés was the Spanish conquistador who conquered the Aztec empire in Mexico. Landing in Mexico, he burned his ships to prevent his men from turning back to Cuba and Spain. It was "conquer or die." Cortés led from the front, was fearless, persistent, and incredibly resourceful. Despite multiple perilous adventures, ambushes, and battles fighting the Aztecs, including the battle of La Noche Triste, and sustaining heavy losses, Cortés triumphed with his handful of conquistadors. With La Malinche as his interpreter and allied with the Tlaxcalans, he ultimately stormed Tenochtitlan, the Aztec capital, and conquered Mexico. Cortés also explored the northern part of Central America and conquered it. He was made a Marquis by Charles V, King of Spain and Holy Roman Emperor, and returned to Spain in 1540 where he died six years later, frustrated and neglected by the Spanish Court, despite his magnificent conquest and the fabulous wealth he attained for Spain.

Rodrigo Borgia7. Rodrigo Borgia, Pope Alexander VI (1431-1503) — Rodrigo Borgia was an outstanding figure of the Italian Renaissance and as Pope Alexander VI (1492-1503). He imperiously divided the New World between Portugal and Spain in 1494 with the Treaty of Tordesillas. He presided over the Borgia family, the Spanish-Italian dynasty that included his uncle, Pope Calixtus III; his son, Caesar Borgia; his daughter, Lucretia Borgia; and his kinsman, the saintly priest, Francis Borgia. Pope Alexander VI enriched the papal domains, collected works of art for the Vatican, and augmented the earthly powers of the pope; but he also intrigued, so as to enrich himself and his family at the expense of the spiritual authority of the Church. His only possible contender or runner-up for this spot would be Benedetto Gaetani, later Pope Boniface VIII (1235-1303).

Sextus Pompey6. Sextus Pompey (67-35 B.C.) — Sextus Pompey was the pious youngest son of Pompey the Great (106-48 B.C.), the Roman general who fought for the Roman Senate against his rival, Julius Caesar. One may ask, why not choose Julius Caesar, Mark Antony, or Pompey the Great rather than his son, Sextus? When Julius Caesar defied the Senate and crossed the Rubicon in 49 B.C., the Pompeians, including Sextus' father Pompey the Great and older brother Gnaeus, fled to the East to gather their armies and prepared for war. Sextus remained with his step mother Cornelia Metella. After the disaster at Pharsala in 48 B.C., Pompey, Cornelia, and his son were briefly reunited. In Egypt, Sextus and his stepmother watched his father's assassination. Later, when Sextus came of age, he also joined the remaining Pompeians, now led by Cato and Metellus Pius Scipio in Africa and made his headquarters in Sicily. The Republicans were defeated in Spain and Africa. Sextus survived and was the last Republican standing, fighting the Second Triumvirate. Sextus had fought on land, particularly in Spain with his brother Gnaeus, as a capable Pompeian general. But he found a greater niche for himself as a very successful admiral of the seas, continuing to harass the great Augustus as a Sicilian pirate until defeated by Marcus Agrippa, captured, and executed.

Aaron Burr5. Aaron Burr (1756-1836) — Aaron Burr served in the American Revolution, was a U.S. Senator from New York, and was the Vice President of the U.S. with Thomas Jefferson as President. In fact, he was defeated in his bid for the presidency in 1800 when Alexander Hamilton used his influence to thwart Burr and help Jefferson in the House of Representatives where the contested election was held. The feud between Hamilton and Burr eventually led Burr to mortally wound Hamilton in a dual at Weehawken in New Jersey in 1804. As Vice President, Burr presided over the famous impeachment proceedings against Supreme Court Justice Samuel P. Chase. Burr then went on a mysterious expedition in the southwest where he sought to either disconnect a western portion of the country from the United States or to conquer Mexico. Burr was absolved of treason charges brought against him for this adventure in another celebrated judicial trial. His only contender for this post is the famous duplicity of the American general James Wilkinson (1757-1825), who was also implicated in a conspiracy to split off the southwest as a separate territory from the United States.

King Harald Hardrada4. King Harald Hardrada ("stern counsel"; 1015-1066) — Hardrada was King of Norway from 1046-1066. Hardrada invaded northern England at Northumberland in alliance with King Harold's brother Tostig in 1066. Harold Godwinson, the English King, came up with his army and surprised King Hardrada and Tostig at Stamford Bridge, who in the vanguard had become dangerously detached from the rest of their army and fleet. Hardrada and Tostig were decisively defeated, killed in the battle, and their armies annihilated, forever ending Scandinavian invasions of the British isles. The word "berserk" of the Old Norse literature was used here in reference to the Norsemen's furious attack that ensued this battle. Before his fatal invasion of England, Hardrada had roamed the European continent seeking adventure as a soldier of fortune, even serving in 1033-1034 with the Varangian guard of the Byzantine Empress Zoe and Emperor Michael IV. Hardrada was the last "Viking" and the last Norseman to terrify the North Seas. The remarkable story is told in the Saga of Harald Hardrada by the adventuresome author, Snorri Sturluson (c. 1230).     
 
Giacomo Casanova3. Giacomo Casanova (1725-1798) — Casanova was a Venetian adventurer, author, womanizer, traveler, and secret spy for his native Venice. He travelled all over Europe, gambling, writing his diary, and seducing women after escaping from the Venice prison, The Leads, in 1756. He became rich after becoming Director of the Lottery in Paris. He won and lost fortunes in his amorous adventures. Here is a man who made it to this list without spilling any blood or engaging in warfare, but by mostly following his adventures and amorous pursuits. Casanova died in Bohemia at the Castle of Dux while serving as a librarian and writing his memoirs. Those memoirs are probably one of the best ever written and certainly the most colorful and descriptive of life in Europe in the late 18th century.  

Prince Rupert of the Rhine2. Prince Rupert of the Rhine (1619-1682) — Rupert's father, Frederick V, the Winter King, was deposed as protestant King of Bohemia (1619-1620). As a child, Rupert and his family wandered through Europe in exile. Prince Rupert possessed natural military ability and as a teenager fought with the Dutch army in the Thirty Years' War. He was the nephew of Charles I  and first cousin to Charles II, Kings of England. While still a young man, Rupert became Cavalry Commander ("Cavalier") and the most audacious Royalist general in the English Civil War, fighting against the Parliamentary Puritan forces ("Roundheads") to restore his uncle, Charles I, to the English throne. When his efforts failed, Rupert, like Sextus Pompey, resorted to piracy to sustain the Royalist cause. Despite Rupert's perilous career — in which he lost his devoted, younger brother, Prince Maurice, and was himself wounded several times, requiring two dangerous trepanations for serious head wounds — he survived and lived through the Restoration to be appointed Constable of Windsor Castle. Prince Rupert was also an inventor of military ordnance, artillery and sea salvage gear. He served the Restoration Court as an administrator, commander of the army and admiral of the Royal Navy, while continuing to pursue various enterprises, founding the Royal Society with his cousin, King Charles II, and conducting scientific experiments. Rupert was also an artist, developing the mezzotint art of engraving. He helped plan explorations, draft maps, and settle Canada with his enterprising commercial venture, the Hudson Bay Company. In his later years, Rupert continued to serve in administrative posts, and died a natural death, being buried in Westminster Abbey with honors.

Sir Richard Francis Burton1. Sir Richard Francis Burton (1821-1890) — Here is a man who, like Giacomo Casanova, was not involved in any defensive or offensive wars, but was largely an inquisitive and peaceful man of letters — and action. Burton was an explorer, linguist, ethnologist, and author. He was fluent in 29 languages, including Sanskrit, Hindustani, Arabic, and Persian; and disguised as an Arab, he traveled and visited the forbidden cities of Mecca and Medina in 1853. He translated the book, One Thousand and One Nights (The Arabian Nights; 1885-1888) from Arabic to English and the Kama Sutra from Sanskrit to English. He also wrote scholarly, authoritative books on falconry and fencing, which are still the gold standard text in those areas. With John H. Speke, Burton explored the source of the Nile, through the jungles of central Africa and Lake Tanganyika. He served as a captain in the army of the East India Company. His wife was devoted to him and through her efforts, he was appointed British consul, serving in Santos, Brazil, and Damascus, Syria, as well as Trieste, where he continued his explorations of the areas under his jurisdiction. Burton was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and was awarded knighthood in 1886 by Queen Victoria. 

That was my list; who's in yours?

Written by Dr. Miguel Faria

Miguel A. Faria Jr., M.D. is Associate Editor in Chief and World Affairs Editor of Surgical Neurology International. He is Clinical Professor of Surgery (Neurosurgery, ret.) and Adjunct Professor of Medical History (ret.), Mercer University School of Medicine. Dr. Faria is the author of Cuba in Revolution — Escape From a Lost Paradise (2002). Dr Faria has written numerous articles on Stalin, communism, and the Soviet Union, all posted at the author’s website: www.haciendapub.com & www.drmiguelfaria.com

Copyright ©2014 Miguel A. Faria, Jr., M.D.


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Comments on this post

Interesting list!

This was a very interesting list and I was not surprised to see Sir Richard as number one! He was indeed a peaceful man, with a true sense of adventure. Some say he was an artistic soul.

Quote: "It was not his nature to give up until all his strength had been expended." — Philip José Farmer, fair description of Burton's character.

Thanks a lot! - Rafael Barros.

Great list!

What interesting characters - great list of adventurers!

Today in history!

April 14, 2014

1861: President Abraham Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth while watching a performance of "Our American Cousin" at Ford's Theater in Washington.

1828: The first edition of Noah Webster's "American Dictionary of the English Language" was published.

1912: The British liner RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg in the North Atlantic at 11:40 p.m. ship's time and began sinking. (The ship went under two hours and 40 minutes later with the loss of 1,514 lives.)

Courtesy: The Associated Press, 2014

Today in History

April 6, 2014:

1994: The Hutu president of Rwanda, Juvenal Habyarimana, was killed along with the president of Burundi, Cyprien Ntaryamira, when their plane was apparently shot down near the Rwandan capital of Kigali; what followed was a 100-day genocide in Rwanda during which more than 500,000 minority Tutsis and moderate members of the Hutu majority were killed by Hutu extremists.

1896: The first modern Olympic games formally opened in Athens, Greece.

1909: American explorers Robert E. Peary and Matthew A. Henson and four Inuits became the first men to reach the North Pole.

April 9

1914: The Tampico Incident took place as eight U.S. sailors were arrested by Mexican authorities for allegedly entering a restricted area and held for a short time before being released. Although Mexico offered a verbal apology, the U.S. demanded a more formal show of contrition; tensions escalated to the point that President Woodrow Wilson sent a naval task force to invade and occupy Veracruz, which in turn led to the downfall of Mexican President Victoriano Huerta.

1413: The coronation of England's King Henry V took place in Westminster Abbey.

1682: French explorer Robert de La Salle claimed the Mississippi River Basin for France.

1865: Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered his army to Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House in Virginia.

April 12

1954: The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission opened a hearing on whether Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, scientific director of the Manhattan Project, should have his security clearance reinstated amid questions about his loyalty (it wasn't).

Courtesy: The Associated Press, 2014



Diary of Dreams performs at the 2016 M’era Luna festival in Hildesheim, Germany. M’era Luna, “one of the biggest dark music events in Germany,” is held each year on the second weekend in August. Close to 25,000 people attend the festival annually to hear gothic, metal and industrial music performed on two large festival-style stages.